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January 30, 2013, 02:00:38 PM
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Offline Peter

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Family of Deceased British Army Officer Calls for Investigation
« on: January 30, 2013, 02:00:38 PM »
Note: If you've only seen this thread, please go here for more information about the Korean cult behind Qi Wellness.

August 25, 2012: Master Oh, Harley Street Guru Who Treats Cancer Patients With Belching Pays Back Thousands to Soldier Who Opted for Bizarre Energy 'Cure' Over Chemo

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A clinic run by a controversial guru who has treated BBC stars has refunded thousands to a terminal cancer patient who thought she could be healed without chemotherapy.

Innersound – run by Korean therapist ‘Master Oh’ – offers bizarre treatments which involve belching to release patients’ ‘bad energy’.
Celebrity clients have included BBC sports presenters Gabby Logan and Clare Balding and actress Rula Lenska.

Naima Mohamed, 27, turned down conventional NHS cancer treatment for Master Oh's therapies
But the clinic, just off London’s Harley Street, has paid out £12,000 after finding itself at the centre of  a legal row with British Army officer Naima Mohamed.

Miss Mohamed, 27, was offered treatments at Innersound. But the clinic insists she decided against chemotherapy herself – against its advice.
Miss Mohamed was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010 at the age of 25, but stopped NHS treatment in January 2011.

A clinic run by a controversial guru who has treated BBC stars has refunded thousands to a terminal cancer patient who thought she could be healed without chemotherapy.

Innersound – run by Korean therapist ‘Master Oh’ – offers bizarre treatments which involve belching to release patients’ ‘bad energy’.
Celebrity clients have included BBC sports presenters Gabby Logan and Clare Balding and actress Rula Lenska.

Naima Mohamed, 27, turned down conventional NHS cancer treatment for Master Oh's therapies
But the clinic, just off London’s Harley Street, has paid out £12,000 after finding itself at the centre of  a legal row with British Army officer Naima Mohamed.

Miss Mohamed, 27, was offered treatments at Innersound. But the clinic insists she decided against chemotherapy herself – against its advice.
Miss Mohamed was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010 at the age of 25, but stopped NHS treatment in January 2011.

She said: ‘I came away from Innersound thinking chemotherapy would not benefit me and I shouldn’t have it.
‘Master Oh was gentle, knowledgeable and spiritual and Innersound has a reputation as a respectable organisation.’
Miss Mohamed paid the clinic £16,000 for a series of Oriental ‘energy’ therapies, including meditation and chanting.

Although she said that she felt some initial improvement, in March this year doctors told her she had just two to three years to live.
Miss Mohamed, from North London, instructed lawyers to reclaim the money she spent on treatment and was paid £12,000 by the clinic on ‘compassionate grounds’ – but with no admission of liability.

Miss Mohamed, who is now  seeking to raise money for specialist treatment in the US, said: ‘As a professional soldier, I would never consider myself to be  gullible. The masters are very reassuring; promising to help you at a time when you are looking  for anything that will make you better.’

Harley Street is home to some of the UK's leading doctors

The Innersound Wellbeing and Meditation Centre, which is a registered charity, treats about 3,000 clients a year.
It has been running for 14  years, previously under the name Ki Health, and also has clinics in Manchester, Exeter, Holland and Australia.
The 14 masters at the London centre press points on the body to open ‘energy pathways’ and use hissing and belching techniques to send ‘Qi energy’ into the body.

Miss Mohamed’s solicitor Clare Kirby said: ‘I have dealt with several complaints against Innersound. In each case, clients of Innersound parted with large sums of money and were left disappointed.’
However, Innersound denied that staff exerted influence on Miss Mohamed or made claims that their treatments could cure her.

They said they advised Miss Mohamed she should consider chemotherapy.

January 23, 2013: Family of Deceased British Army Officer Calls for Investigation of Cult

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The family of a 27-year-old British Army officer who died of cancer in November (2012) have called for an investigation into the brainwashing tactics of a group who claimed they could cure her cancer.  Leaders of Innersound, who have a clinic in London and are recognized as a cult by UK experts,  dissuaded Naima Mohamed from having the chemotherapy that could have saved her life. Innersound ‘masters’ claimed she would recover from their meditation and therapy alone,  and that chemotherapy was poison.

The Sandhurst-trained officer rejected chemotherapy and all other NHS treatments in January 2011. She handed over more than £15k to Innersound, but then the cancer spread to her sternum and lungs. Naima was told  in July last year by hospital doctors her family persuaded her to see that she had around two years to live, but she died in a hospice near her family in Poole just four months later.

Naima’s Moroccan-born father Ben Mohamed, 68, wept as he told last week “Naima was totally under the spell of those so called masters, and she kept saying they knew how to cure her, that she would be OK.  There needs to be an investigation into what they are doing. They are telling very sick people they can cure them and it’s just rubbish.  It’s just a shame my daughter didn’t realize this sooner, when she could have had life saving treatment. They made her believe chemotherapy was poison that would harm her body not cure it.  At the end of her life Naima said to me ‘I’m so sorry dad. I was wrong’.  Something needs to happen to stop them doing this to others.” Naima’s distraught mother Saida has been staying with relatives in France since the funeral on 18th November.

Naima’s grandfather Thomas Philips, a British man who was in the Navy said “I too would like to see an investigation.  Naima kept taking me to the clinic, convinced their massages would cure my arthritis and heart trouble.  They encourage clients to bring relatives for treatments.  It wasn’t magical or miraculous, just expensive massage,  and  Naima was very struck with them.  I suppose she was brainwashed, but it was hard to reach that conclusion there as the masters all seemed so genuine and kind.  Naima kept saying ‘they are taking the badness out of me granddad, and you have to believe it.’” Mr Philips says Innersound were ‘bleeding Naima dry’ and she often asked him for loans to pay for her treatments.

The Innersound Foundation, just off Harley Street and formerly known as Ki Health, told Naima that their Master Oh (photo left) had cured himself of cancer and said he could cure hers. The enrobed South Korean leader said she would recover through ‘ancestral healing’ which gets rid of ancestors’ ‘bad energy’ to heal their troubled successors living in the present.

A 32 year old management consultant who was seeing Innersound masters at the same time as Naima for bowel disease, who can’t be named in this article for legal reasons, has pledged to sign an affidavit to swear by what he witnessed.  He said “ I saw masters tell Naima she didn’t need chemotherapy.  Master Oh said he had cured himself of stomach cancer, and that  he would help to cure her.  Another master claimed she was healed of breast cancer, and Naima could be healed too. Master Oh also told many others in my presence he could cure them of  different illnesses.”

Anti-cult expert Graham Baldwin, who runs the Catalyst charity which helps victims of cults and their families, said “This group prey on vulnerable, desperate people to abuse them financially and mentally.  Any organization which suggest  a girl with cancer should stop chemotherapy is not doing what could be expected of any charity.  Innersound are never going to improve anyone’s chances of recovering from a terminal illness.  They should lose their charitable status, and police need to investigate them under the 1939 Cancer Act which forbids false claims for cancer cures.”

Naima, who grew up in Winchester,  paid £9,000 for ancestral healing and parted with another £7,000 for other oriental therapies including meditation, chanting and to pay for for elaborate ceremonies.  Patients are made to belch and hiss in the belief this will get rid of the ‘bad energy’ that is making them sick.

Naima originally contacted Innersound for spiritual enlightenment after hearing about them from a fellow soldier, and was diagnosed with breast cancer the following year. Her close friend Dulcie Fernandez said   “Naima is very sorry that she ever went to Innersound and she would want it known that their treatments don’t work.”

I met Naima at her lodgings in London in July.  She said  “I was given the firm impression by the masters that chemotherapy wasn’t going to work for me.  They told me this, and they seemed so knowledgeable, so genuine and compassionate I believed them.  I’m a soldier, a professional, and I am not a gullible person, but they influenced me at a time when I was highly vulnerable, promising me life-saving things I desperately wanted to believe. I wish now that I hadn’t.”

Cult expert lawyer Claire Kirby helped Naima last year get a £12k refund from Innersound, who say they repaid the money out of compassion and accept no liability for Naima’s  then failing heath.

Kirby claimed Innersound used ‘undue influence’ to extract monies, by befriending Naima and winning her confidence.  In a letter to them she says “…(our client) was encouraged to trust and revere the masters and to believe in the teachings of Innersound including that the treatments and trainings had an excellent success rate of getting people with cancer better again.  Master Oh stated that our client did not need chemotherapy,  and that if she committed herself to the program could heal herself of cancer.’

Innersound’s therapies use techniques derived from those used by a South Korean couple jailed in 2000 for conning their followers out of £44 million.  Mo Haeng Yong and Park Gui Dal were imprisoned in Seoul for 8 and  5 years respectively. Innersound deny associations with the couple, although they  have visited them in the UK.

Ki Health were forced to change their name to Innersound after being exposed by a British newspaper in 2008. They now are alls using the name Qi Wellness. Frequent name-changing is routine among cults who want to distance themselves from negative publicity and law enforcement.  The UK anti-cult movement is lobbying the Charity Commission for it to withdraw Innersound’s charitable status.

June 25, 2014, 11:40:12 PM
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Offline Peter

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Re: Family of Deceased British Army Officer Calls for Investigation
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2014, 11:40:12 PM »
Family of Deceased British Army Officer Calls for Investigation of Cult
Here is Innersound's (now Qiwellness) response to the above article sent internally to members/patients:
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The Innersound Foundation (“Innersound”) would like to respond to the article posted on cultnews.com on 23 January 2012. 

Innersound is a registered charity and its focus is on helping others. Innersound wellness centres provide support and energy treatments, classes and ancestral healing based on the principle of Qi (which means energy, and is a common feature of Eastern philosophy, religion and even martial arts).  Innersound is not a medical service and does not purport to be. We believe, on legal advice, that the article published last month on cultnews.com is defamatory.  It contains a number of untrue and, frankly, hurtful statements. 

We do not wish to respond to each and every allegation made.  The article turns upon Ms Naima Mohamed, who died last year due to cancer, and the grief of her family.  Innersound, in fact, made a payment, on compassionate grounds, to Ms Mohamed in June 2012.  We do not understand why the article has been published over six months after that compassionate payment, and some months after her passing away. 

It is untrue that Ms Mohamed was dissuaded from having chemotherapy, or that she was told she would recover from cancer through meditation and therapy. Ms Mohamed was advised, as are all Innersound clients with health conditions, to remain under and follow the advice of a medical practitioner. It was her own decision as to what medical or other treatment she undertook.

Several individuals at Innersound, notably Master Oh, strongly encouraged Ms Mohamed to follow the advice of her medical specialist and consider chemotherapy.  It is entirely false to suggest that Master Oh, or anyone connected with Innersound, told Ms Mohamed that Qi treatments or ancestral healing would cure her cancer.  That allegation goes against everything Innersound stands for. 

However, and more importantly, we are seriously concerned that the article is seeking to create publicity from the grief of the Mohamed family.  It is untrue that Innersound staff gave Ms Mohamed “false hope” in relation to her condition.  The Foundation is not a hospital, nor a medical centre.  It is a wellbeing centre.  We simply do not understand why a website would go to such extraordinary lengths to publish such a lengthy article, including a litany of defamatory comments, at this time.  Nobody benefits from this article, least of all the Mohamed family. 


June 27, 2014, 09:58:41 PM
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Offline Peter

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Re: Family of Deceased British Army Officer Calls for Investigation
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2014, 09:58:41 PM »
Innersound, in fact, made a payment, on compassionate grounds, to Ms Mohamed in June 2012.  We do not understand why the article has been published over six months after that compassionate payment, and some months after her passing away. 

They used the word "compassionate" twice. See attached file.


March 30, 2015, 10:46:52 PM
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Offline Peter

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Re: Family of Deceased British Army Officer Calls for Investigation
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2015, 10:46:52 PM »
November 19, 2012: Heartbroken Friends Say Goodbye to Tragic Soldier

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HEARTBROKEN family, friends and comrades of a Poole army officer said goodbye to her yesterday after she lost her battle with cancer.

Sandhurst army graduate Capt Naima Houder-Mohamed, who grew up in Canford Heath, died on Saturday after being diagnosed with terminal cancer five months ago. She had spent her final days with her family in Poole.

The 27-year-old Muslim, a former Parkstone Grammar School pupil, was laid to rest in Kinson Cemetery 24 hours after her death in what is believed to be the first UK military funeral for a serving Muslim female officer.

After private blessings at Bournemouth’s Central Mosque, the hearse arrived at the cemetery and Naima’s coffin, draped in a Union Flag and adorned with a poppy wreath, cap and sword, was carried by six pall bearers from the Adjutant General Corps, with which she served.

Imam Majid Yasin said a prayer in Arabic before Military Padre Gary Keith spoke as Naima’s family, including brother Rachid and parents Ben and Saida, looked on.

He said: “As we gather in this place today we do so to honour the life of a courageous and committed, very determined young army officer, Captain Naima Houder Mohamed.

“We do so to give thanks for her full and her active life, to commend her to God’s safe keeping.”

He said Naima was “greatly loved, admired and respected” and was a “cherished and much valued member of the family home, of her community and of the British Army”.

Naima graduated from Sandhurst in 2009 and then served with 22 Engineer Regiment and 1 Royal Anglian.

Regimental Colonel Rob Davie said Naima became a qualified mountain leader in 2006, gaining advanced status in 2009. She ran expeditions in Kenya, Morocco and France. She undertook Nordic skiing and biathlon and did training exercises in Scotland and Poland.

Naima had been set to go to Afghanistan but her illness prevented her from doing so.

Col Davie said: “Naima gathered a wealth of experience as an army officer during her relatively short career.

“She readily sought out new challenges and tackled them with enthusiasm and a steely determination to succeed.

“She worked tirelessly for her people and that reflected the motto of Sandhurst – Serve to Lead.

“Tragically taken long before her time, Naima leaves behind a devoted family and despite being sorely missed by her comrades in the army, we know this is nothing compared to the loss that her family will feel.

“We are both proud and privileged to have served with Naima.”

After Captain Afzal Amin, the Armed Forces Muslim Chairman, recited the opening chapter of the Quran in Arabic and English and read from a letter Naima wrote before her death, her coffin was lowered into the ground before a nine-gun salute was sounded and a bugler played the Last Post.

Naima wrote that she had tried to cope with her illness in a “dignified and fortified way”.

“I tried to deal with this illness the best way possible, I have done everything possible to beat this.”

She added: “For all those who know me, both friends and family, I have lived life to the fullest and made the most of every day, although it was hard towards the end.”

Fighting back tears as he read, Capt Amin finished the letter, in which Naima wrote: “I leave this earth knowing that I meant so much to so many people and I hope you will never forget me.”