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January 30, 2013, 04:15:10 PM
Reply #15

Offline Peter

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Re: The Shinchonji National Olympiad/Day of Mannam: Sept 16, 2012
« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2013, 04:15:10 PM »
An astounding piece of propaganda just popped up on www.biztechreport.com. I'm not sure what cult propaganda has to do with "business" and "technology", but they thought it related enough to stick on the their front page ;) Slow news month?
Perhaps a big fat cheque? Just plain clueless?


http://www.biztechreport.com/story/2433-world-peace-festival
PDF of the issue: http://www.biztechreport.com/pdf/AP-2012-12.pdf

The spiritual yearnings of Koreans can be difficult to fathom. Just as K Pop has taken off from Tokyo to New York, Korean spiritual movements draw adherents worldwide over seemingly insurmountable barriers.

movements draw adherents worldwide over seemingly insurmountable barriers. That was sense one received after witnessing the “World Peace Festival” in the Olympic Stadium in Seoul’s Jamsil district on September 16. The audience had come prepared for a few hours of singing and fun. They could not have envisioned 100,000 people filling every seat in the stadium, including thousands more on the playing field, marching in elaborate formations, dancing and enacting various traditional and cultural performances.

The program, a “culture and sports celebration of restoring light,” wound up with men and women’s soccer games, a track meet, basketball, judo, and tug of war matches. In addition, on stage in front of the reviewing area, magicians and ballroom dancers and jazz musicians and a host of other entertainers were performing as well. This World Peace Festival evoked memories. Was it an improved version of the Olympic Games that opened in Korea 24 years ago at this very stadium? During those games in 1988 we saw performances as amazing as the prancing and dancing of thousands of performers against a backdrop of tens of thousands of people in the stands flipping flash cards of scenes and messages of whatever the South Koreans were selling, from happy school kids to verdant fields. History was repeating itself, perhaps, but on a much bigger scale.

As during the ‘88 Olympics, many people were on the field at the recent peace festival. Young people from all over the world dressed in their traditional colors filled the stadium, flipping cards on cue, forming slogans and scenes. This whole performance lasted for more than eleven hours, from morning until after dark when the rain was already falling and pinpoints of lights replaced the cards.

Much of the inspiration comes from the Honorary Chairman Mr. Lee Manhee, who is also the founder pastor of Shinchonji Church of Jesus Christ. Mr. Lee is viewed as one of the most renowned spiritual leaders from Korea by Christians all over the world. Despite his busy schedule he sat through the whole program alongside Ms. Kim Namhee, Chairwoman of MANNAM Volunteer Association, which collaborated with the church on the mission of putting on “an unprecedented event in Korea where people from all over the world will gather.” Shinchonji means new heaven and earth, and MANNAM means meeting, implying a gathering of diverse figures In today’s Korea, Shinchonji Church and MANNAM are among the most active organizations in the fields of culture and the arts. In the recent past they have undertaken many projects and activities benefiting the downtrodden in both Korean society and abroad. Thus, it was no surprise that thousands of foreigners were seen attending the event, both as participants in cultural programs and games as well as guests of honor. Not many associations in Korea can claim this level of support from foreign communities.

To an outside observer such outbursts of astounding fervor as those on display at the World Peace Festival represent a significant aspect of Korean life and spirit.

One real question which comes to mind after watching such a grand show is how Shinchonji and MANNAM – one being a religious group, the other a volunteer association – were able to attain such an extraordinary array of talent on the tracks, fields, stages and stands of the event. The organizers call it “the world’s biggest peace festival in modern times.” They may be right. Millions of people were able to watch the event on live telecasts and Internet streaming all over the world. Also on display was the famed Korean hospitality as most dignitaries viewed the whole show from seats along side the honorary chairman Mr. Lee Manhee and the chairwoman Ms. Kim Namhee in a specially designated enclosure.

For their respective contributions to the day’s proceedings, both host organizations did extraordinarily well. Shinchonji’s contribution – the biblical performance – was most impressively depicted, being enacted on the field by massgame players with cards and flags, and by a 12,000member flashcard team in the stands. The athletic aspect of the events, called the Olympiad, pitted athletes from foreign countries against one another in peaceful and friendly competition. Indeed, the entire theme of the Olympiad was one of world unity, centering around the idea of Korean reunification. There were also various cultural performances by MANNAM members such as cultural dances by groups from the Middle East, Latin America, China and India, singers, bands, and magicians.

Incredibly, these events seemed to be going on simultaneously. Men’s and women’s basketball teams were playing in courts at both ends of the field. While runners were circling the surrounding track, performers were going through their acts in the middle of the field. Flash cards held by thousands on one side of the stands depicted scenes and slogans, and all the while mammoth television screens captured and replayed action, ensuring that everyone got a chance to see what was going on. The effect was that of a masterpiece of organization, planning and rehearsal that had gone on for months before the day of the festival. The imagination of the planners showed not only their true desire for international peace, but also the undying ‘cando’ spirit of the incredibly hardworking Korean people. In preparing for the event, they extracted themes from popular and traditional culture in a reflection of the national and religious spirit of the Korean people. “One of the most impressive moments was the constant waves that rolled through the stadium stands as thousands actively took part in the show,” said one spectator; “The unison and precision of the performancer moved all who were watching.”

The massgames were envisioned by the planners “to demonstrate the unity of all cultures and the capacity of people to create peace.” Mannam was responsible for bringing thousands of volunteers not only to attend the festival but also to volunteer their time, expertise and enthusiasm in the months prior and in the times needed for rehearsals. The campaign for volunteers was all in the name of peace, of helping people in dire straits. Nothing seems to have been overlooked in conveying this message.

“The campaign’s purpose was to raise awareness for peace that is achieved through understanding and appreciation of diversity,” says Mannam. In pursuing that aim, the festival began with the dedication of a photo project in which a globe was unveiled made of “thousands of pieces with 3,913 photos of individuals and their sentiments on peace.” The idea, says Mannam, was to form “a representation of individuals joining together for the peace and restoration of the world.” The program ended in driving rain “with the lighting of a hundred thousand lanterns during the live performance of the 1988 Seoul Olympics song ‘Hand in Hand,’ accompanied by fireworks.”

The emphasis on global understanding was visible everywhere. “The World Peace Festival was not a gathering of nations but of people from all different ethnicities, religions and ideologies that strive towards an achievable peace,” says the brochure. The alliance between Mannam and Shinchonji deepens the sense of purpose. While MANNAM is a secular organization, its partnership with Shinchonji strengthens the message of nondiscriminatory acceptance of all cultures, faiths, ethnicities and nationalities while providing a religious overlay that attracts devotees looking for new hope and a renewed sense of purpose in a world of conflict.

The union of MANNAM and Shinchonji, represents how two different organizations working in unison can achieve wonders. Many other religious organizations who were otherwise not part of the festival were eager to extend their support after seeing the sheer force of spiritual energy displayed by members of Shinchonji and the volunteers of MANNAM.

After the show many South Korean media reports quoted a number of foreigners about how excited they were to be part of this onceinalifetime event. Many felt they had seen something that they would not see again in their lifetimes. The event was also wellattended by foreign media groups, all of whom wrote interesting reports on the event for publication in their own countries.

Even though Shinchonji’s leader, Lee Manhee, is the honorary chairman of MANNAM, the two organizations are entirely separate entities that operate on entirely separate mandates. The World Peace Festival was “a joint sporting event.” No sooner had the festival ended than the blogosphere lit up with comments about the true nature and impact of the event, both good and bad. One blogger found that, “despite the grandness of the event, its long term impact may not be as big and long lasting as proclaimed by the organizers.” However, the majority of bloggers were appreciative of the effort made by everyone to do their bit to pro Most foreigners who attended the festival came away with feelings of having participated in a great international, intercultural experience – a oneofakind event – something truly unique. Many confessed they were not expecting such a grand cultural treat.

MANNAM has become very wellknown for its celebrations of patriotic holidays, including the national day on August 15 marking the surrender of the Japanese forces occupying Korea at the end of World War II in 1945 and Korea’s freedom after 35 years of occupation. These celebrations are typically marked by a deep sense of patriotism and national pride. MANNAM members, on such occasions, dress up in shirts displaying the yin and yang symbol of the Korean flag, a symbol that represents the ideas of unity, balance and harmony. Typical of the reception that the movement is getting from Korea’s other religious originations, there appears to be a certain jealousy over the rapid rise of Shinchonji. The church, founded in 1984, has gained members with a basic message of love and humanity. According to the church, Shinchonji members “pursue and practice love, forgiveness, and acts of kindness toward others.”

“Currently, Shinchonji spreads the message of God in more than 300 churches all around the world and does diverse volunteer activities.” MANNAM’s rise has been no less phenomenal. Since its founding nine years ago with a mere 700 members, the MANNAM Volunteer Association now claims 70,000 members. “It has emerged as a major force of peace all over the globe, organizing many peacepromoting activities,” claims the history page of a MANNAM leaflet. For the love of Taegukgi, the Korean flag, and the national flower Mugunghwa (the Rose of Sharon), Mannam has emerged as an organization that not only glorifies volunteerism but also inspires world peace as the most active Korean NGO on the world stage. Some have accused MANNAM of being the front organization for Shinchonji to collect funds and recruit new members. But this is not the case, as the nature and scope of MANNAM is very different from that of Shinchonji. Shinchonji has its own strong base and thus does not need help from any other organizations to attract new members. Pastor Lee’s strong spiritual leadership is the real reason for the fast growth of the church.

Pastor Lee relies upon his own distinctive teachings to imbue his church with the dynamism needed to win hearts and minds. The most captivating message is that of peace for all mankind. “Let us love the global village which gives us light, rain and air of the sky,” said Lee at the World Peace Festival. “Love is able to make world peace and restore true light.”

Mr. Lee sometimes reminisces about his service during the Korean War as a young man. “I know well the reality of war as I had joined the army to avoid hunger,” he said. “I know very well what mankind wants and needs. I hold this festival to pray for the realization of world peace.” That is, without a doubt, a message with a universal appeal. A message that not even the most hardened skeptic could deny being relevant to our world.

 

March 24, 2013, 01:02:15 PM
Reply #16

Offline Peter

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Re: The Shinchonji National Olympiad/Day of Mannam: Sept 16, 2012
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2013, 01:02:15 PM »
Another take on the big day from SCJ^^ from http://cafe.naver.com/scjschool/146541
Click on English under the language bar on the right and scroll to the post on page 2 entitled "Brief explanations on the World Peace Festival Restoration of Light Culture and Sports".
Thanks to master Mannam-watcher Zackary for the find.

Quote
Brief explanations on the World Peace Festival Restoration of Light Culture and Sports
 
World peace and restoration of light will be accomplished through the 6th World Peace Festival, which was co-hosted by Shinchonji and Mannam International Volunteer Association. Below is the brief rundown on the events and the scenes of the festival on the day it was held.
 
The Millennial Gate is opened as the countdown is finished. Two representatives of Shinchonji and Mannam enter through that gate while holding their hands and shouting hurray together. Their hope-filled footsteps are radiant, and all the spectators are welcoming the two representatives with hearty greetings.
 
After the entry of the two people, the athletes from the twelve tribes of Shinchonji—who look like the heavenly warriors clothed in twelve different colors—and Mannam International athletes clothed in white uniforms are bravely entering with the images of the four living creatures in heaven and their distinct music instrument ahead of them. Their marching is as brave as warriors, and their multi-colored clothing as magnificent as flowers in the garden.  

The entry is followed by hopeful and life-filled opening speeches from the two representatives, the mass game performance by 2,000 people, and the card performances by 12,000 people. Simultaneously the twelve tribes and Mannam International are cheering for their own teams, and it is as if they are creating 13 different colored waves all over the sports stadium. Simply put, the entire scene is portraying all the events from the Book of Revelation, and it is truly the culture that heaven is only able to show to people.
 
An angel receives fire of the holy spirit from heaven. He passes it on to the promised messenger (pastor). The promised messenger passes it on to the leaders of the twelve tribes. The twelve tribe leaders shoot the twelve flames of fire to the torch stand like arrows. The flames of the holy spirit are arising high in the sky. The flame of the torch has been ignited for the first time in 24 years since the same stadium held the 1988 Seoul Olympics. People around the world are watching the lit torch at the stadium and through the Internet live broadcast. The fire of the holy spirit is entering into the eyes of everyone, who is watching the torch stand. The hearts and the thoughts of people, who have just received the fire through their eyes, are being united as one with the fire of peace. They are shouting and shouting with cheer. This amazing unity is now being portrayed by the writings and pictures of the mass game and of the card performances. Peaceful shouts are emerging from all people.
 
More of the peaceful messages are being adding from the congratulatory speeches from the special advisor of the president and other VIP guests from all over the world. Soon after all the speeches are finished, the gigantic mass game begins to show the fulfillment of the book of Revelation. The group of the dragon, which symbolizes Satan, invades heaven. Heaven is symbolic of the tabernacle of God’s chosen people, portrayed as the golden lampstand. The invasion of the dragon is followed by the destruction of the tabernacle of heaven. The messenger of heaven witnesses the entire event. He shoots an arrow and destroys the group of the dragon. The dragon splits into seven pieces and is scattered into seven ways. As the messenger of heaven puts the war to an end, a strong roar of victory fills up the whole stadium. 200,000 spectators inside and outside the stadium are being unified as one like the flowers of heaven.  
 
The messenger of heaven receives the revealed scroll coming from heaven and shouts its message like a loud trumpet call. The trumpet sound gathers all people around the world, and the grand festival of God, World Peace Festival, Restoration of Light Culture and Sports, finally begins.

In the afternoon, another mass game is performed with the theme of the unification of the divided Korea. Back in 1950, a tragic Korean War broke out on June 25. North Korean soldiers were forcing their way down to the southern part of Korea and occupied the land except the region of Busan in South Korea. South Koreans, with the help of the UN soldiers, pushed their way towards north and were able to reach Mt. Backdoo. As soon as they reached the far northern side, Chinese soldiers intervened, and the South Koreans had to step back and move down to the 38th Parallel.
The whole world is paying their close attention to Korea. All of sudden, there is a trumpet sound that announces the culture from heaven. The trumpet call transforms people of the world into the doves of peace. These doves push their way upwards with the Declaration of the Unification of Korea Monument ahead of them. Wherever the monument covers turns into the unified land. North and South Korea are unified, and the world puts war to an end. The festival of God, which promotes world peace, begins.  
 
There are 200,000 spectators watching this festival through two gigantic screens inside the stadium and three other ample ones outside the stadium! The sound of their cheer shakes the sky. The seats are all filled up from morning till evening. When the sun goes down, everyone turns on their lanterns, and they twinkle beautifully like stars in the night sky. All the eyes that look at these little sparkling lights are filled with so much inspiration. It starts to drizzle late at night as if it were the tears of the deceased souls, who knew the tragedy of war, but now rejoice over the end of war.

The twelve tribes are joyfully engaged in the festival of the sun, moon, and stars of heaven. Twelve colored angels are gathering to the stadium like butterflies that smelled the flowers of heaven. Everyone hugs and dances together. The sonorous sounds of different drums lift up every one's hearts and make people feel that they are walking on the clouds. Shinchonji and Mannam create unity where there is no high or low among people, and where a king and a servant becomes one. Lastly, they play the scene of the wedding banquet of heaven. It is indeed the site of the accomplishment of the world peace and the restoration of light!
 
All the events are translated into seven different languages and are broadcast live to the whole world through Internet broadcasting. International reporters around the world also air the show to their own countries. The citizens around the world, who watch the festival, put up bright and hopeful expressions on their faces. Now they are busy inviting Shinchonji and Mannam over to their own countries. Furthermore, Shinchonji and Mannam produced DVDs of the world peace festival and sent them to all countries in the world. They are looking forward to hearing from the presidents and broadcasting station officials, who watched the festival of God, the festival that truly promotes world peace and restores the lost light.
 
World peace and restoration of light have been seen by heaven and earth. The globe will be united as one, and world peace will be attained. The lost light will be restored in our generation.


May 05, 2013, 12:39:19 PM
Reply #17

Offline Peter

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Re: The Shinchonji National Olympiad/Day of Mannam: Sept 16, 2012
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2013, 12:39:19 PM »
More Mannam goodness, one of the best yet.

Quote
Man Hee Lee is the honorary chairman of MANNAM Volunteer Association.
He is the anchor of MANNAM Volunteer Association.

Through the 6th World Peace Restoration of Light Culture and Sports festival, the eyes and the ears of people, who have watched the event, have been opened. This festival has opened up their eyes and ears because it portrayed the culture of heaven where the spirit of heaven dwelt. Victory, joy, unity, and the flowers of love have bloomed widely, and the flames of peace have risen high.

The footsteps of world peace and the restoration of light have begun humbly, but prosperous will the end be! The seed of the light of life has been planted, and it will bear its fruit. Light has met with another light, and they will become a greater light. World peace will be accomplished, and light will be restored as everyone is united through love. All things will respond to the culture of the pioneers, who bring world peace and restore the light.

The representative of the Mannam Volunteer Association, Ms. Kim, has been watching the honorary chairman closely. There is a statement the representative Kim has been proclaiming during each and every festival she hosted. She has spoken several times in public how the honorary chairman, Lee, Man Hee, was someone that the Republic of Korea as well as the whole world absolutely needs, and that everybody should at least meet him once in their life time.

During one of the opening speeches for the World Peace Festival, the representative Kim confidently assured everyone that the 6th World Peace Festival would surely let everyone understand why the honorary chairman, Lee, Man Hee, was an essential person to all mankind. If you were one of the spectators of the event on that day, you will know the answer to her statement.

International participants around the world didn’t leave their seats from morning till late night. Shouts from the participants never stopped for a second. People’s hearts and thoughts were united throughout the event. This is the answer to her statement. The honorary chairman Lee is the embodiment of the true light, life and love, and he continues working to bring peace and to restore the light to the world. He is someone that all mankind should at least meet once in order to accomplish world peace.

The reason spectators didn't leave their seats was because they weren't allowed to. Some did disobey though - see below.


October 25, 2013, 11:34:11 AM
Reply #19

Offline Peter

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Re: The Shinchonji National Olympiad/Day of Mannam: Sept 16, 2012
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2013, 11:34:11 AM »
I just noticed an interesting comment on this thread at Dave's ESL Cafe from a person who attended the "Olympiad":

Quote
I went. The cultish atmosphere was creepy. While leaving I asked a random person working there how to get to the subway. Her question? "Did anyone say you can leave?" Shocked As if I need permission? I was worried she wouldn't believe me when I told her "yes" and abduct me or something.

November 23, 2013, 04:17:04 PM
Reply #20

Offline Peter

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Re: The Shinchonji National Olympiad/Day of Mannam: Sept 16, 2012
« Reply #20 on: November 23, 2013, 04:17:04 PM »
An interesting account of the efforts "Mannam" went to in order to populate the Olympic Stadium for the Shinchonji Creationist Olympic Games thing:

Quote
... It began like this: last week I was approached on the street of my new city by a couple of attractive Korean girls. They asked me if I spoke Korean, and I gave my usual spiel about how I spoke just a little. They said they wanted to meet foreigners for their social club. As I said, there are only two types of Koreans who approach foreigners, and neither of these two spoke much English, so I probably should have been wary. But I’m keen to practice my Korean, and the materials they showed me didn’t seem religious. I thought that they were part of some university social club that wanted to meet foreigners to practice English, which is not unusual here. And I’m new in town, and would like to make some Korean friends. And they were really cute. So I gave them my phone number.

Today, the one with whom I spoke the most messaged me on Kakao Talk and asked if I had time to meet for coffee. She wanted to tell me about what her group was doing this Sunday. I was happy to go along. I was quite excited about my coffee date with the cute Korean girl.

So we met up and she took me to a cafe. Things were immediately a little weird. With her was the other cute Korean girl who had been recruiting with her, which was fine, but accompanying them was a grim-looking fifty-something Korean man, who bought us all coffees. We sat down and I had to ask for introductions. All of this was in Korean, and my Korean is not too hot, so I felt at a disadvantage. They told me the man was their… something, but it wasn’t a word in my limited Korean vocabulary.

They immediately produced a pamphlet promoting the World Peace Initiative, and wanted me to come on a bus with them this Sunday to Seoul to attend. They showed me a video on their phone. Both the pamphlet and the video, like the name of the festival, seemed curiously devoid of actual content. It was hard to tell exactly what they wanted me to come to, or why. I tried to ask who they were, what their group was, but I couldn’t follow the answer. They pointed to a logo on the front of the brochure which said “Mannam”.

They had made a tactical error. I was really quite open to the idea of hanging out with them on Sunday, and if we’d begun with some conversation, and the weird older guy hadn’t been there, I might have signed up. But the situation and their abruptness made me uneasy.

So I made some excuse about being busy, and things got awkward. They kept trying to convince me, in Korean I couldn’t really understand, and they seemed sad that I didn’t want to come, and I felt bad. I tried to make conversation with them, and they seemed nice and fun, but they kept coming back to the festival. I tried to tell them that I was interested in making Korean friends, and that I would be happy to do something with them some time in town, but I wasn’t going to go off to Seoul with them to attend the festival.

I was getting frustrated and I tried to make the point that they had come on a bit strong. I said to them that I wanted to make Korean friends, but that I would be more comfortable starting with coffee and conversation, and maybe meeting for some drinks, and then, if we were friends, we could go to Seoul. They said they wanted to make friends with me by inviting me to come to Seoul with them as part of their group. The middle aged-man looked put out and wandered off. He hadn’t really participated in the conversation.

I looked up the word cult on my phone dictionary and showed it to them. The thing is, I still didn’t think that they were a cult. I was just trying to illustrate the point that they had come on way too heavy and made me feel uncomfortable. They seemed genuinely regretful. I thought that they were just Korean volunteers for some oddball organization, and I was being unduly suspicious. I wondered if I should just have said yes, and seen where it all went; certainly there was nothing threatening about the situation. They told me that they were “good people” and not “bad people” – yes, this is the level of my Korean – and told me to look them up on Naver, where I would see that Mannam International and the World Peace Initiative were good organizations.

It was incredibly awkward. I had rejected their offer, eventually insistently, and my Korean isn’t really good enough to hold up a conversation for very long, and certainly not good enough for the kind of social niceties that the situation demanded. I finished my coffee quickly. I asked them if they wanted to go, and they said they were meeting another friend there. They said thank you for coming to meet us, and that if I changed my mind I should call them. I left.

I came home and took their advice, and looked up their loopy organization, which quickly took me to this article in the Korean Herald, and this thread on waygook.org, which is remarkably informative (for a thread on waygook.org).

I was surprised, but not very, to discover that my perceptions of oddness and cultishness were correct, and I wasn’t just being paranoid and over-cautious. It turns out that their Mannam volunteer organization is devoted to recruiting foreigners for the Shinchonji cult. Their motives seem pretty inscrutable – apparently they organize a lot of seemingly worthwhile activities and their approach to foreigners is very charming and generous, in contrast to the dues levied and duties assigned to Koreans. Is it preparation for a foreign push, or just that weird Korean desire for the affirmation of foreigners?

The thing is that I quite liked the Korean girl – her English name was Alice – who I had been talking to. I sent her a message, just saying “Shinchonji”. I was curious how she would respond.

A few minutes later she replied, in Korean: “We are not Shinchonji. We are Mannam volunteers.” ....

November 23, 2013, 04:21:05 PM
Reply #21

Offline Peter

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Re: The Shinchonji National Olympiad/Day of Mannam: Sept 16, 2012
« Reply #21 on: November 23, 2013, 04:21:05 PM »
And from behind the curtain comes this testimony from the only foreign former member of Shinchonji to speak of their experiences.

Here is the part of the interview related to the SCJ Creationist Cult Olympic Games Mass Big Thingy:

Quote
Talk about Mannam and its connection to Shinchonji.

1. I had to watch a video on Mannam to find out it was started in 2003. The aim is to do good and bring all people together. Many Mannam members in SCJ are ignorant of many things that outsiders know about the group like the mote of “When light meets light there is victory” is an anagram and the Mannam logo is the combination of all 12 tribe colours and that Man Hee Lee, who is the “honorary chairman” and the combination of Kim Nam Lee's names give Man+Nam= Mannam.

2. All the upper level planning meetings of Mannam are done in the SCJ temple buildings and only Mannam members who are SCJ may attend those meetings. These meeting always have in attendance the high profile Mannam members who I found denied their association with SCJ if asked.

3. Funding for events comes from SCJ. The upper level members of the organization are SCJ the organizers of groups such as Korean classes, Tai Kwan Do classes, photography classes, basketball, running club and cooking club are all headed by SCJ/Mannam members. They may be two different organizations but the direction of Mannam is clearly directed by SCJ.

What was expected to happen at the September 16th event at the Olympic stadium in Seoul?

1.The event was something that already busy members were told was the most important thing and they should not give up what they were doing but add to the plate by actively seeking foreigners and telling them about this great amazing event where there would be a free ride to and from the event, free lunches, and a free t-shirt.

2. The lunch was not very good and many people were herded to dark gloomy corners to scarf down a lunch with no place to sit. There were many more people than expected, so lots of people did not get their t-shirts and the ride was free...but the price was all day at an event designed to distract and look confusing.

3. Many people did not even get into the stadium. Soccer teams that were asked to come at 6 a.m. never even got the chance to play. In fact, only one game was played and that was SCJ's team against the Mannam team from Seoul. Guess who won.

4. There were too many people in the stadium and the chaos was created on purpose. Most of the stands were taken up but SCJ people who chanted and did the wave almost continuously throughout the day, in sports uniforms matching the colours of their different tribes. If people didn't get the idea that SCJ was a cult before, this certainly helped make the decision. CULT...the tribe members never mingled with the foreigners at all and there was an abundance of security all over the place.

5. Even though the stands were crowded beyond capacity, there was room where all the dignitaries were seated. The event began at 10 am but I suspect - from having attended two other events similar to this - that most SCJ members had been there since well be for 8 or even 7 am. Man Hee Lee arrived just a little before 10am in a nice car with a driver and walked on a red carpet to a seat with a silk cushion, surrounded by the dignitaries who had been invited for the biggest photo/video opt ever undertaken. Given refreshments and lovely young ladies smiling in beautiful gowns, with media watching and reporting from above.

6. The mask games were like being in North Korea and I know one foreigner that was in the mask games and said that he hoped God was pleased with his effort that he sat for almost 12 hours flipping cards.

7. I had been told on many occasions before the event that the truth about Mannam and SCJ would be explained at the event and that the lying would end. It didn't and for reasons of conscience felt this was very wrong.

8. It was also rumoured that something great would happen at the event.  Many military personal that were there heard the rumour that a famous music group would be playing at the end of the night. And SCJ members were looking for the sign that perhaps MHL would do something truly miraculous.  But, looking at it, having that many people together basically to worship the ego of one man is a miracle, just not the miracle most were looking for.

9. After the event it was expected that everyone who attended the event would have someone from the church maintaining them and bringing them to the truth. A surge, if you will, of new converts that just needed to be taught. The opposite was true. Many people were very angry with what happened.

10. I stood by the entrance to the stadium with a group of military who were supposed to be participating in the sports events. They were to do a parade past the dignitaries and MHL. It was a wait of almost 3 hours. In that group of military was a family who had twin boys around 8 years old. They waited and asked if they could leave as they needed to get their children home and to bed for school the next day. They were cajoled and tricked into standing there until the 5 min walk by the grand stands and were asked to release red and white balloons.  It was something to have a 100,000 people cheer as you walked in, but not worth lying to a family desperate to get home.

11. A video on youtube made by a man by the name of Michael drew some conclusions from the event that a) SCJ seemed to be very much a cult and b) Mannam was indeed, as suspected, a creation of SCJ. He was fair in his observations and never disrespectful in any way, but I was told that Michael and others who made any kind of negative report about the event to be in league with Satan and pushing the destroyers´ agenda. SCJ members are not supposed to watch the lies that they produce.

12. The event ended with a grotesque dance between MHL and Kim Nam Lee, which was explained to me, when enquires were made, that it symbolized the marriage between Christ and his bride or Mannam's new partnership with SCJ. I found this in poor taste as MHL has a lovely wife who has stood by him all this time. And I felt nothing but shame and humiliation that her husband would parade around with a younger, richer and more socially influential member of SCJ as the actor of this little drama.

13. In talking from the pulpit the following Sunday, MHL said he wished that every Sunday could be like September 16.  That was it.  Shortly after, I let the leader of the cell group know it was time to leave for reasons of conscience.

 

September 15, 2014, 11:40:01 PM
Reply #22

Offline Peter

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Re: The Shinchonji National Olympiad/Day of Mannam: Sept 16, 2012
« Reply #22 on: September 15, 2014, 11:40:01 PM »
Another account of the big day just came in. Nice timing considering today's the day attendees start arriving for this year's cult extravaganza. Will they try to exercise the same control this time around? We can only hope...  ;)

Quote
Well, they wanted me there really early in the day for the opening ceremony. I knew that my events (100m and 200m) were in the afternoon though, so I insisted on getting there later (it wasn't like there was a big prize for winning, so I figured I'd risk them making an ultimatum). I got there with time to spare for my events and waited. And waited. And waited. It took literally hours until we were finally led out to the track. While I waited, I wandered around with my wife, and while to me everyone just looked like normal sports fans, she was thoroughly creeped out by the people; the way they cheered, how the cheerleader-types practiced, stuff like that.

I was interviewed. They wanted me to say their slogan on camera, and since the whole thing was starting to feel very Jim Jones-like to me by this point, I refused (they seemed very disappointed by this).

The creepiest thing though was when we left. We had some trouble finding the exit (the stadium is a little confusing that way), so we stopped someone to ask for directions. Her response? She asked, "did someone say you could leave?" My wife blurted out a yes, we got directions, and took off before they passed out any cool-aid.