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July 04, 2008, 11:35:16 PM
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Offline Peter

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KiHealth: London Testimonies
« on: July 04, 2008, 11:35:16 PM »
The Kihealth thread over at www.cultexit.org includes an astounding testimony with some pretty heavy duty insider information.
http://cultexit.org/evoke/page/2306

The author just registered here, but had some trouble activating their account, that should be sorted now and it looks like this cult that stayed hidden and practically unknown for over a decade is about to get its comeuppance.

The following two testimonies were written by the same person. Posted twice due to a little confusion about how threads appear on the cultexit site.
Replies to specific posts aren't as easily visible as fresh replies, so I think it looked like the first post didn't go through. All sorted now and here's the testimony:

Quote

I myself spent nearly 4 years and gave over £10K to the people who run this organisation, as I (along with hundreds of others) simply believed them to be a meditation group that could help me with my health and well-being.

They claim they are a charity and describe themselves as pious holy people who are doing good works for humanity from the bottom of their hearts. My experiences with them and information I learnt about them subsequent to my leaving them has convinced me that they are operating fraudulently.

The organisation formerly known as Chun do Suhn Bup are now calling themselves Ki Health International (Charity Registration No 1073341). They say they are helping humanity by offering treatments to sick people and offering what they call ancestor training. When a newcomer arrives at the centre, it is recommended that they buy 6 treatments. The treatments last around 10 minutes and use acupressure to treat the patient. During these treatments, the masters (as they call themselves) tell the patient that their disease / distress is due to ancestral energy which is causing blockages in their energy systems. They then recommend either that they embark on a training programme, consisting of 100 sessions at their centre where the trainee does chanting and slow movements rather similar to those used in tai chi or yoga.

Sometimes, if the master feels the person is gullible enough, the ancestral training programme is introduced immediately. The trainee will be told that to rid themselves of negative energy which is causing their distress / disease, they should do ancestral training which will remove the bad spirit energy and allow them to live comfortably and peacefully.

Some visitors to the centre are immediately attracted to this, as they may be in such a bad state and have tried many other methods to improve their health / well-being, and feel that this is their last hope. Some visitors to the centre are seriously ill and very depressed, and easily convinced that they need to clear bad energy from their ancestors who are ruining their lives.

The cost of the ancestral training? Simply to begin, it costs at least £1300.to do both mother and fathers lines (ancestors on both sides). However, it is made very clear that the effect of the training will be felt much more strongly if the trainee also does training for related spirits, the spirits of people who knew their blood-relations and affected their lives in some way. The reasons being that they could be responsible for the bad energy too, as they may have had issues with the ancestors. So the cost now is a further £1300, totalling £2600.

The masters will then describe the 24 day prayer that needs to be done, the first day of which is a reporting ceremony in which the name of the trainee and his mother and father (with addresses) is reported. Money is also offered on this day. Trainees are, believe it or not, always told to give cash, because ancestors like cash. Seriously! Im surprised nothing has been done about this organisation before.

Trainees are told that during the reporting ceremony, their ancestors are going to be present, and they will recognise cash but not a cheque.

Its going to take me ages to explain all of this nonsense. Suffice it to say that hundreds of people are doing and have done these ceremonies. Ki Health International is making monkeys of many people, and I strongly suspect that at least 90% of their income is cash. This explains the frequent visits that master oh makes to Korea (around 10 a year, maybe more). The organisations headquarters is in a place they call Daerachun, in Hongchun, Korea.

Every Sunday they have a ceremony, to which trainees who wish their loved ones and themselves to get better must attend. During this ceremony, wine is offered to the ancestors by trainees doing the ancestral training, then there is an hour or so of chanting, followed by a talk by master oh. His command of English is quite poor, however he repeats himself many times, generally saying that the trainees should be grateful to have this opportunity of healing their families and themselves, and should always show their beautiful minds by giving as much as they can to the organisation. He reminds trainees that the reason for the training being costly is that God will only respond to real cries for help, and that God sees the sacrifice of large amounts of money to the organisation as a genuine cry for help.

The reason people keep going to the centre? Because they are emotionally blackmailed into believing that if they stop, they and their families will suffer.

Trainees are told that the originators of the organisation are divinities, what they call grand masters. They also say that they can read peoples minds. When I stopped visiting the centre, I bumped into one of the other trainees in London, who advised me to look up Korean Doomsday Cult on the internet. He told me this would dissipate any last doubts I had about the verisimilitude of their claims. It turns out that father grandmaster is in prison (both mother and father were jailed in 2001 for telling hundreds of Korean trainees that the world would end on February 17th 2000), and that they should give huge amounts of money to them to ensure that they and their families would be protected by heaven.

This has to be read to be believed - please visit

http://www.rickross.com/reference/millennium/millennium76.html

http://www.cesnur.org/testi/Y2K_006.htm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/617962.stm

When mother grandmaster was released from prison, she and master oh who now runs the London centre decided that the time was ripe to make monkeys of the British people. It had troubles in the beginning because some people found out who they really were, hence the changing of their name from Chun do Suhn Bup to Ki Health International.

It must be said that the main reason that no one has blown the whistle on these people is that they are afraid to do so. To do the ancestral training, the masters take the names and addresses of trainees parents. This, to their mind, ensures that no one will risk taking them to court.

The couple who run the centre call themselves master oh and master kim. Ohs real name is Soon Tak Oh, his wife Sung Hee Kim. They have a young daughter. I happen to know their real names because I have a copy of a marriage certificate between Oh and one of the British girls he somehow coerced into joining the organisation with him - her name is Emilie Weston, she now calls herself master jin.

The certificate proves that they were married on 13th June 2002 at Hitchin and Stevenage registry office. The wedding was witnessed by his own wife Kim, and another of the British girls they coerced into forming the organisation with them, a Leigh-Anne Miles, who now calls herself master mo.

Clearly they married so that he could obtain British citizenship. I believe the 4 masters on the marriage certificate are the ringleaders of this cult in London, and Im sure that all 4 of them - Emilie Weston, Leigh-Anne Miles, Soon Tak Oh and Sung Hee Kim have private accounts of their own into which they are depositing large amounts of money. There are other masters in the centre (mostly British citizens who have given everything they own to Oh and his wife). However, I feel they probably dont know whats really going on.

Further proof that the afore-mentioned masters are the ringleaders of this cult are the names on the charity commissions records citing them as directors of the company. Please visit the following link which will show their 4 names as directors, and the amount of money they have declared. Being that trainees are asked to pay in cash seems to indicate that the £449,000-00 declared for last year is simply the tip of the iceberg of their true income. As I say, Ohs oft-repeated trips to Korea suggest that huge amounts of cash are leaving the country with him.

http://www.charitycommission.gov.uk/registeredcharities/AccountListing.asp?charitynumber=1073341

I also have a copy of an email sent from master oh to one of the centres first trainees, who somehow learnt of their rotten history and made attempts to blow the whistle on them. The email in question clearly threatens this persons life.

The way that these masters impose themselves on peoples lives is a disgrace. One of the trainees, a carpentry teacher, sold his house and gave them £200K when they panicked everyone by saying the organisation may close due to lack of funds (the trainees become dependant on the group and are afraid of the organisation folding). This individual now lives in a camper-van.

As part of Kis attempts to fulfil their charitable image, they give free treatments to members of the metropolitan police, ambulance services and fire brigade. They take photos of themselves giving treatments to workers in these professions and plaster them all over the walls within their centre, to show members of the public that they are helping humanity and to insinuate themselves into peoples confidence.

Its about time the final whistle was blown on these freaks!

__________________________________________
Quote

I encountered Ki Health International at a Mind Body Spirit fair in London in 2005. Orthodox medicine had failed to help me with back pain that was making my life uncomfortable, and as in the past I'd had some astonishingly good results from some of the alternative practises available, I was open to trying something new. The people at the stall were dressed in ceremonial robes, some of them European, some of them Asian. I was told to take my shoes off, lie down and relax. One of the people at the stall introduced himself as Master Oh, and proceeded to give me a treatment. It was similar to acupressure I'd experienced previously. However the pressure on various parts of my body was accompanied by hissing sounds from Oh. He told me later this is to transmit energy into my body and clear blockages. He then told me that I should visit their centre in London to have a course of treatments.

A few hours after the treatment I began to feel light-headed and happy. For the next 2 days this feeling continued, however my aches and pains returned. I'd been impressed by Oh's treatment so wanted to see him again. I contacted the centre and arranged for another session. I was told that I should book 5, which I did. I didn't see Oh again, the other sessions were with various masters, one of whom told me that the reason for my problems was bad spirit energy. I asked what this meant. I was told that my life was being negatively affected by unhappy spirits, the spirits of my ancestors. I was then told that the Masters had a means of clearing this bad energy from me, by enrolling me on an ancestral healing programme. For this, a private appointment was made with a Master Jin. She told me that I should do a 24 day prayer during which I should visit the centre every day to chant and pray. During the 24 days I would attend 5 special ceremonies, led by Oh. During the ceremonies I was instructed I should offer food to my ancestors, food that I should prepare at home and bring with me to every Wednesday ceremony. How much food? Enough to feed 20 people. Just one dish? No, 3 separate dishes, cooked by myself. I was also to bring flowers to the ceremonies, and give £10 each time for fruit, all to be presented to the spirits of my ancestors.

This is a lot to take in, I told Jin. How much does it cost? To do this prayer for the spirits related to both my parents would cost £1300. I was shocked by this, and too embarrassed to comment. She went on to say that I should also pray for related spirits, these being the spirits of those who were in various ways connected to my ancestors, but not directly related. People who had caused trouble for my ancestors during their lives. Jin recommended that I pray for the related spirits too, as she could sense a great deal of bad spirit energy around me and felt that I should do everything I could to clear it. The price of praying for related spirits as well as those of my ancestors would be another £1300, totalling £2600. Jin told me that the effects of the prayer would be much more effective if I did it all in one go.

I told her that I would think about it, that I couldn't afford it. She told me "your health and that of your family is the most precious thing, this is a wonderful opportunity to do something special for your loved ones." She went on to say that the ancestral healing would give robust health not just to myself, but to all my family members. She also told me to trust in God. I wasn't convinced that God lived at 33 Margaret Street, W1 just yet, so I told her that I would think about it.

One of the others masters suggested I begin a training schedule, comprising 100 visits to the centre during which I would chant, meditate and do simple exercises, similar to tai chi. I was told that doing the hanuel ship sun bu training would teach me how to heal myself, and not be reliant on their treatments. The cost would be £3600. I agreed to do this, as it appeared to be a much cheaper way of getting something out of what I'd already started. I couldn't deny that the treatments were effective, if only for short periods of time. It is because I found the treatments to be effective that I decided to try the training programme.

To do the training I had to wear a special white uniform, which looks like those used in Kung Fu. At 12 o'clock every day, a dozen or so trainees like myself would disappear into the fountain of life, a large hall, at the front of which hangs a large circular object, which I was told is made out of a rare metal that has special powers (they call it jinbox.) On this object is enamelled a simple scene, a mountain, the sea and a red and white ball in the sky, apparently representing the sun and moon. I'm told this is called the 'symbol of truth', and I'm to make a deep bow in front of it when I enter the hall, before presenting my reporting card to the master leading the class.

After making 3 bows (I was shown a special way to do this), the class begins, and consists of chanting a particular chant 7 times, from a book containing chun moon or 'heavenly orders'. After which, 20 minutes are spent doing slow, very specific movements, some of which I recognised from tai chi, and the remaining 20 minutes are spent in meditation.

There are separate changing rooms for male and female trainees at the centre. When I began the training classes (I was encouraged to do these at least 3 times a week) one of the things I found immediately curious was the odd atmosphere within the changing rooms. Some trainees didn't speak at all. Others, with whom I got chatting, had extraordinary stories to tell, mostly questioning the integrity of the organisation itself. I asked those who expressed unhappiness with the way things were run at the centre why they were so unhappy, and invariably the answer was the large sums of money that the ancestral healing cost. I would ask 'why do it then?', and one of the most memorable answers I got was 'because Master Oh says that what you give, you will get back, in this life or in the afterlife'.

After doing a few weeks of the training schedule, I began to wonder whether or not to do the ancestral healing. One of the masters told me that my health would only improve 30% if I didn't, and that the energy that I was receiving in the 'fountain of life' was not being digested properly because I'd not done the ancestral healing. Finally I decided to do it. I did everything I was told, attend the centre every day for 24 days, cook huge amounts of food (much of which went in the bin, along with other trainees' food immediately after the ceremonies). I was told I should attend chanting classes every day before the regular training class. These also last an hour, and consist wholly of chanting, with a short meditation to finish.

After the 24 days were up I was completely exhausted. Having spent 24 days travelling into one of the most polluted cities on earth to do spiritual work for my family had taken a lot out of me. I was told when I'd finished that I should keep coming in for another week or so, to help digest the energy I'd received.

There was no noticeable difference in my health after the 24 days. I phoned my parents and told them as much as I could (without appearing completely crazy) about what I'd been up to. They told me they hadn't noticed any improvement in their health and well-being. I didn't expect an immediate result, so decided to persist with the regular training and chanting classes for another few months, to give it a chance to work.

After a few weeks, Master Jin tells me that I should do another ceremony, called 'Four House Angels'. She explains this is a single ceremony that will forever attach four benevolent angels to my home, who will make my home life harmonious and protect my possessions from thieves. This is now getting too absurd for words but, stupidly, I find myself going through with it. The cost? Another £3900.

By this point, I'd invested over £4000 in Ki Health International. And there was more to come. Chatting with others in the same boat as myself (those who, like myself, had already done ancestor healing etc and were suspending their disbelief as best they could), news began to emerge about another 100 days special prayer. Upon enquiring, I found out that the initial 24 day prayer is simply the beginning, and that further work has to be done to notice any improvement in my health and that of my family. By now my suspended disbelief has nearly been crushed, but not quite. When I express my doubts to one of the masters, I'm told we have proved to you that we have a direct connection to God, through the treatments you receive here which are so effective for you, so clearly everything we tell you to do is going to make you better. I'm then told to do another 100 day prayer, after which my family and I will surely be in much better health. A final roll of the die, I tell myself. In for a penny, in for a pound. And so I hand over another £2600.

Needless to say, I notice no improvements in my health or that of my family members during or after the prayer. During this 100 days I'm told to attend all the Sunday ceremonies. After each of the ceremonies, Master Oh gives a long talk, often exceeding an hour. It's difficult to understand much of what he says, he tends to repeat himself a lot, however the basic message is that we (the trainees) are very lucky to have discovered this method of healing, and that we are going to save the world with Ki energy. In one especially memorable ceremony, Oh chastises some trainees who have criticised the organisation's aggressive money-making techniques, saying God responds only to those whose cries for help are seen as genuine. Freely giving large amounts of money to us, as spokespeople for God, is the only way that your prayers for your health and well-being are going to be answered.

Shortly after this time, one of the trainees drew my attention to various websites which talk about the 'Korean Doomsday Cult', and all my doubts about the integrity of Ki Health are confirmed. Further investigation reveals that the Grandmasters, who according to the masters within the centre, spent 30 years doing arduous training in the mountains of Korea, were in fact imprisoned in 2001 for swindling hundreds Koreans out of vast sums of money. They did this by convincing them that the world would end on February 17th 2000, and that by giving as much money as they could, their souls and those of their family members would be assured of a special place in heaven.

July 13, 2008, 11:38:40 PM
Reply #1

Offline Peter

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Re: KiHealth: London Testimonies
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2008, 11:38:40 PM »
Another testimony was posted on Roy's site last week by "Gods R US" giving a very detailed account of how they currently operate and naming the people involved:

    I got involved in them in 2005 when I finally had enough eighteen months later I am embarrassed to admit I had spent at least £20,000 on them. Here is some info I gleaned about them. If I had this sort of info upfront I would never have got involved.

    The various incarnations of the group are registered as a religion / charity / business dependng on where they are.
    Ki Health International also known as Chun Do Sun Bup, Jung Shim Institute,
    Chunjonhoe, Heaven's Gathering etc.

    The founders who are referred to as the Grandmasters within the organisation are:-

    Mo Haeng Yong d.o.b 26th October 1934

    Other spellings of name

    Mo Haeng Ryong

    Mo Haeng-Ryong

    Also known as Father Grandmaster


    Gui Dal Park d.o.b 13th February 1949

    Other spellings of name

    Kui Dal Park

    Also known as Mother Grandmaster


    This is a Korean based Doomsday/Mind Control cult, whose headquarters Daerachun / Taerachun is in Hong Chun/ Hong Cheon South Korea. The Grandmasters were imprisoned in 2000 for fraud.

    Ki Health centres tend to be in cosmopolitan areas and are run by the masters who live onsite. New recruits are sought, by masters selling ki energy treatments mainly at alternative health festivals & exhibitions. Most masters have virtually no medical or physiological knowledge but give people hands on treatments and advice about health.
    People are encouraged to have more treatments, by being told they have "blockages" which is stopping them from receiving energy properly.

    After a person has had a few treatments they are encouraged to become a trainee doing exercise and chanting classes in the training hall known as "The Fountain of Life" which contains a huge symbol on the wall known as "The symbol of truth". The Grandmasters who are regarded as "Living Gods" allegedly transmit energy to it, which people receive whilst training.

    Trainees are pressured into spending a lot of time at the Ki Centre, cleaning and doing other odd jobs, by doing this they are told that they will receive more energy as they are "showing their minds". After a while people are approached to do "Family Healing" also known as "Ancestor Training". This is incredibly expensive when people baulk at the cost and say they can't afford that order of money, it is often suggested that they get bank loans..

    Ancestor Training consists of preparing huge amounts of food, buying flowers, fruit, wine, money to be put on the Shin Dan (Alter) which is in "The Fountain of Life", to appease various spirits, followed by a ceremony, where wine is offered to spirits, and chanting and meditation takes place. The chanting etc is all in Korean.

    Once someone starts on the "Ancestor Training" path they usually don't feel any better, the response from master tends to be "they and their ancestors are not cultivated enough" and therefore must to do more of this training.

    Anyone, who has a relative that dies, is asked to do special ceremonies for them almost immediately. People end up paying huge sums of money by any normal standards, to KHI. Many people have parted with far more than a years wages whilst involved with this group. Most people cannot afford the sums of money asked of them, but are desperate for anything that may help them and their families, so they end up heavily in debt.

    People are also pressured into giving large sums of money to sponsor the many ceremonies they have there, which includes one every Sunday Morning and many all night ceremonies that are timed to coincide with a simultaneous one taking place at the Korean Headquarters.

    As well as paying for all the training, people are frequently asked to buy things for masters personal needs and also for the centre, the people who are seen to have given the most during the week, get rewarded by offering wine to various spirits at the Sunday Ceremony, this is said to give one more abilities.

    Cash is the preferred form of payment. "The ancestors need cash", is the story given.

    People are constantly told how lucky they are to have found KHI and that they "Must show there Gratitude".

April 09, 2009, 09:09:01 AM
Reply #2

Offline Peter

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Re: KiHealth: London Testimonies
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2009, 09:09:01 AM »
A positive testimony that mentions the belching but doesn't menion the criminal convictions of the founders, that seems to have been kept from her. From 2007, just came across it.
 ;)

http://www.thelondonword.com/2007/08/the-ki-to-good-health/

A Sanctuary in Oxford Circus
By Abberline Vaseline
[email protected]

Forget Nike Town and Top Shop. The frenzy of Oxford Circus seems a world away from this inner-city sanctum. At one of London’s most frenetic intersections, I discover an oasis of calm.

Polished wooden floors guide my newly naked feet to a welcoming reception of landscape paintings and aquamarine life. Guests lounge on puffy cushions, whispering quietly, and encouraging quotes suspend from the wall: “Take good care of your body and keep it clean and tidy”.

As I scan the airy room, honing-in on a giant bowl of fresh fruit salad, a friendly looking woman behind the service desk catches my eye.

“You’re booked in with Master Oh,” she proclaims with delight once I introduce myself. I feel like I should be impressed. Whoever this Master Oh is, he must be an important guy. So after completing the obligatory health check-list I flick through a deck of brochures and press cuttings in a bid to unearth the mystery of Master Oh.

I am impressed. A survivor of stomach cancer, Master Oh turned to Ki (pronounced ‘kee’) energy treatment 20 years ago after growing increasingly frustrated with conventional medicine. He’s been practicing and teaching the 6000 year old South Korean healing technique ever since, and is now the most experienced practitioner in the West.

A unique and revolutionary therapy aimed at helping patients with various ailments, Ki is drawn from ancient Taoist healing traditions, and uses specific sounds and breathing techniques to remove blockages from a person’s energy system. This enables the patient to overcome both mental and physical problems, ultimately leading to a healthier and more fulfilling lifestyle.

The Ki Health Centre is a non-profit charity which strives to improve the health and wellbeing of communities world wide, assisting organisations like Crisis, Breakthrough Breast Cancer, fire brigades, ambulance services and even athletes in the London Marathon.

Praising testimonials from around the world pay tribute to their ability to cure everything from eczema to depression, Multiple Sclerosis, infertility, stress and even cancer. And though I don’t suffer from serious illness, I’m keen to regenerate a body and mind fatigued by the stresses of urban life.

Soft-spoken Master Oh is decked-out in martial arts gear and a gleaming smile. He asks me to draw a deep breath as I lie on my back, fully clothed, in his treatment room.

What follows is a series of hissing and belching noises as he zaps my invisible energy knots with acupressure, jabbing my abdomen, back, neck, legs, head and arms. Drawing from my own experience full stomachs are not recommended, though the noises from the man himself make it highly entertaining as he draws out my toxins and neutralises them.

Ki treatment is fast and the effect is immediate. Within 15 minutes I am back on my bare feet while Master Oh explains what he sensed from my energy flow.

Strangely, he reveals that I have weaker than average kidneys (that explains the kidney pains I suffered as a child): “The kidneys are like a car battery…everything in your body relies on them to keep it going,” Master Oh explains.

His knowledge is immense and his devotion to helping people is inspirational. “We had one woman with arthritis who couldn’t even write her own name when she came in, and within a couple of treatments she could.”

I leave the Ki Health Centre with a strange sense that my head is floating, and a realisation that Master Oh’s dedication to helping others is driven by none other than a profound love and respect for life.

As I collect my shoes and descend into the madness of the city circus, I hold tightly onto that peace of mind.


April 11, 2009, 04:34:06 PM
Reply #3

Offline Kuki

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Re: KiHealth: London Testimonies
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2009, 04:34:06 PM »
This article states that Master Oh started Ki Training 20 years ago. Other articles claim he's had over 30 International experience doing Ki treatments. Master Oh was born in 1966.

April 13, 2009, 09:36:16 PM
Reply #4

Offline Peter

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Re: KiHealth: London Testimonies
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2009, 09:36:16 PM »
From The Guardian and mentioned on the Ki Health org homepage.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/sep/22/healthandwellbeing.pressandpublishing

Boiling point
When her colleagues suggested she would be a perfect candidate for anger-management therapy, Elle editor Lorraine Candy was surprised. Four treatments later, she feels calmer - but not cured

Lorraine Candy
The Guardian,    Monday 22 September 2008
Article history
Ask anyone to keep count of the number of times they get angry in one day and my guess is the figure would head towards double digits pretty quickly. If you're a woman with a stressful full-time job, three children under six, a diabetic Airedale terrier, a pregnant nanny, a partner who also works full-time and a staff of 35 other women to manage then, believe me, that number easily surpasses double digits by lunchtime. But given our time-poor (and now cash-poor) "have-it-all" lifestyle, isn't a simmering level of female fury understandable? To be expected even? I thought so, until my colleagues suggested I take an anger management course.

Let me explain. I wanted to commission a debate on how cross women seem to be today - from the media-hyped explosion of aggressive girl gangs to the observation that the women taking part in the BBC's Apprentice seemed to get so much angrier than the male contestants. "Let's get someone to test anger-management solutions," I said. Ten minutes later my features editor popped her head round my office door and suggested I was the perfect candidate.

The good news? My team weren't too scared to suggest anger management to me in person; I mean I'm not Tony Soprano for goodness sake. The bad news? When quizzed, a friend confirms I do spend a ludicrous amount of time getting angry about everything and nothing, barely keeping a lid on the "mean reds" as Holly Golightly called them in Breakfast at Tiffany's. Let's be clear, I am not the female equivalent of Gordon Ramsay. I never shout at people, and I cope well in a crisis. No cover for the October issue? I'm as cool as a cucumber. Mobile phone lost at bottom of handbag? Steam is coming out of my ears.

It's the small stuff that infuriates me. I'm prone to checkout rage, bus-stop rage, taxi rage, and changing-room rage, but it's mostly white-goods rage that takes up my time. Other significant fury flashbacks include the time I beat my non-starting VW Beetle Basil Fawlty style with a branch, the day my husband hauled me off the broken dishwasher, as I attacked it with the business end of a Louboutin, and the toaster with a fork permanently rammed in it, like a piece of mad modern art. But I am not alone. A recent study by the Mental Health Foundation concluded Britain is becoming an angrier nation, with women finding it harder to control their rage. Ultimately, I don't like feeling this cross: it's tiring and my children have started to mimic my Marge Simpson-like growling.

I set out to try four treatments that each offer a different ethos of tackling anger and stress. First up is an appointment at the Hale Clinic to see Dawn Templeton, a counsellor and psychotherapist. She explores the emotions behind my angry outbursts, and the learned behaviour of the sufferer. She asks how anger was dealt with in my family as a child. My recollection is that it was fine to show anger, usually quite loudly.

"There is a difference between expressing anger and understanding the origin of the anger," she tells me. "By attempting to understand the feelings behind the anger, and often normalise them, you feel heard and hopefully understood. Once a person feels understood, they can access the feelings underneath the anger, which are often those of sadness, disappointment and grief. The anger masks those feelings and acts like a protective blanket around us.

"So, if you have had parents who are freely able to express anger this may have given you permission to express your own anger, but - and this is a big but - until you understand your own anger and why it leaks out everywhere, you will stay in a frustrated place, any additional stress on top will cause it to leak out," she tells me.

Templeton likens my anger to a glass of water, which keeps spilling over the top but needs to be emptied from below. Counselling is a lengthy process and she recommends six one-hour sessions, which I don't have time for. She uses a simple technique, which can help in the meantime. The TRAIN acronym: "T", talk to someone; "R", relax in a way that suits you; "A" for activity - keep fit; "I" for interest, find one; "N" for nutrition, take care of what you put into your body. This makes sense to me. Sometimes I think tiredness may be the reason for most of my anger. My youngest wakes at around 6am every day.

Next I try laughter yoga. The theory is that you learn to fake laughter and thus fool your body into releasing feelgood chemicals that boost your immune system and help you deal with stress better. Laughter can lower blood pressure and produce endorphins that promote wellbeing. It is used in hospitals, especially with children, to boost immune systems and generate a positive attitude.

Julie Whitehead, a laughter trainer dressed top to toe in pink, teaches me how to laugh spontaneously, at nothing. We sing a song (All my cells are well), we "ho ho ho" while waltzing around the room and we try "humour aerobics", which is literally forcing your face into a smile. There's not much yoga, but apparently that would be included in follow-up sessions. I love the idea of laughter yoga (just thinking about it makes me, well, laugh) but I'm far to uptight for this kind of stress relief. Though I do try forcing out a spontaneous smile every now and again - it's especially effective in a tense meeting: weirdly if you smile everyone else does too.

Now for hypnotherapy. Steve Burns, of the Therapy Lounge in London, explains how he will help me "relearn" my reactions to things that make me angry. He will programme me under hypnosis. I respond well. It normally takes a person three sessions to go into as deep a "sleep" as I do, he tells me after 30 minutes of hypnosis which feels like five seconds to me. I recall very little. Frankly I'm just grateful to be lying on a couch for 30 minutes during the day. His advice is useful: if you can recognise that you cannot control many situations you are in, your reaction to them is calmer. It is also about the language you use with yourself. "I must get that bus." Really? You'd like to but in reality you may not; you have no control over this. "Must"/"need"/"have to" are harsh words to use. I now keep a 30-minute session on my iPod. It all makes sense, but it takes time and patience.

A little disheartened, I try some ki energy treatment. Tired, irritable, with the words of South Park's Cartman ringing in my ears -"bunch of tree-hugging hippy crap" - I reluctantly head off to see Master Oh (yes, that is his name). But I tell you, if you haven't had a small Korean man in nicely ironed linens belch, yawn, hiss and grunt at you as he painfully pummels your abdomen, you are missing out on something quite extraordinary. The theory is that ki - or energy - flows through us all. When it flows freely it keeps us healthy and happy, but when there are blockages the energy slows down and turns toxic, making it difficult to deal with stress and harming the immune system. This treatment unblocks the blockages. The ki master re-vibrates your energy with the noises he makes so it flows more fluidly and massages your energy knots. He also gives you his energy. I'm not sure how.

Master Oh tells me I have a fiery energy and a very sensitive system; this makes me creative but volatile. I use all my energy up immediately, he says, and it is all in the upper part of my body, which explains the weakness of my kidneys (he's right, I do get kidney infections). Three sessions down the line I feel a lot calmer and a lot less stressed. This has made a real difference. I am also sleeping well.

So what have I learned? The basic problem is one most working women with young families face - I don't have enough hours in the day and this makes me impatient and frustrated. The female ability to multi-task is not a godsend, it is a curse, and I think it makes women secretly furious. Oddly the ki energy treatment seems to have made me feel physically less stressed and less wired on a day to day basis. I have slowed down and begun to accept that I cannot control every situation. Buses will be late, four-year-olds will insist on wearing odd shoes to school, gadgets will defy me.


Being able to show your anger, according to Templeton, is a skill, not a problem. Keeping it inside is damaging and, she believes, can often lead to various forms of depression. Counselling is probably the key treatment if your anger is really affecting the way you live. But I think anger like mine is part of the female condition. There is a line in the Simpsons movie that sums it up for me. Lisa tells her mother she is so full of anger she doesn't know what to do about it. "Lisa," says Marge, "you're a woman, you can hold onto it for the rest of your life"

· Lorraine Candy is editor-in-chief of Elle magazine

June 09, 2009, 08:12:00 AM
Reply #5

Offline Peter

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Re: KiHealth: London Testimonies
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2009, 08:12:00 AM »
http://www.stylebible.com/details.aspx?pCat=1&id=2719
Author: Dr. Morgaine Gaye

Shoes off, herbal tea in hand and forms filled in; I was about to try out a healing treatment at Ki Global. Apparently, like the majority of people who go to one of the three UK centres for Ki Energy Healing – I felt like I was in pretty good health.

I was told (nay, warned) by the assistant, that Master Oh (the most powerful Ki therapist in the West) would be making sounds, noises and burping quite a lot – as part of my release process. I was to except that the treatment would transform my negative, stuck energy blocks into positive energy and light, giving me an overall feeling of energy, wellbeing and less pain or stiffness.

Having had a number of alternative therapies previously, I have to admit that I was perhaps a little sceptical of what a man burping for me, could achieve.

Enter Master Oh; a diminutive Korean man who lay me down for my 15 minutes of treatment –that’s a whole session. He began by ‘seeing’ where my energy blocks were and immediately identified my weak kidney energy, which was in turn, giving me neck pains and a weak thyroid function. He was completely accurate. He found blocks and pains I didn’t even know I had. By digging his hands into the offending areas (and my goodness, you know when he finds them because it HURTS!) he begins making a series of noises, and yes, burping. The intense amount of focus and work Master Oh seemed to exert during my treatment was impressive, quite overwhelming and not for the faint-hearted!

Immediately afterwards I felt lighter and brighter. Some of my neck pain had diminished and I was told that the 10 years of blocked energy had been freed up a little. I yawned all the way home (very normal) and I woke the next morning feeling like I had spent hours in the gym. My muscles and body ached but I still felt the benefits of session.

Master Oh spends a portion of his time treating groups of ill and impoverished people around the world so it may be one of his highly trained staff who work on you at the new Ki Global premises near Harley Street.

Contact them to request further details or to book a Ki Treatment visit their webpage www.kiglobal.org or call 0845 459 1025 or 07532 291 176.

December 05, 2013, 10:48:47 PM
Reply #6

Offline Peter

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Re: KiHealth: London Testimonies
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2013, 10:48:47 PM »
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1241320/It-happened-I-didnt-sleep-year.html


Quote
I didn't sleep for a whole year...and it cost me my degree course, my girlfriend and almost my sanity

Most people suffer from insomnia at some point in their life, but for Marco Mureno it lasted an agonising two years, costing him his degree course, his girlfriend and nearly his sanity. Here, the 33-year-old from south London recalls the slow torture of endless sleepless nights
Life was good when I climbed into bed one evening in April 2002. I was studying marketing at Greenwich University during the day, working as a waiter in the evenings and enjoying every second of work and play. I was young, happy and carefree and, as I shut my eyes, I expected sleep to envelop me, as it always did.

But that night was different. I tossed and turned, but couldn't fall asleep. There was nothing playing on my mind, no niggling worries or exciting plans. It was the first time in my life I had ever failed to drift off.

I didn't wake up the next morning - because I never fell asleep. I was exhausted but I managed to get through the day. That night, I collapsed into bed, but when I shut my eyes, nothing happened. By day three of being constantly awake, I felt awful and I looked rough, too, with a grey complexion and eyes red with tiredness. I still couldn't understand what was happening to me, but I couldn't believe it was anything lasting. Surely, that night, I would finally get the sleep I needed. But, once again, nothing - just another night of hell. I tried closing my mind to thoughts and counting numbers, but to no avail.

By day four, I was stumbling around like a zombie. I couldn't concentrate and I was grumpy and snappy all the time. My only moments of slumber came during lectures. One minute I would be listening to a tutor, and the next my head would bump onto my desk, waking me with a start.

That weekend, I decided to see if alcohol would help. I went out with my friends, downed several large drinks and then headed home, convinced that would do the trick. But, again, I stayed awake. Each night seemed to last an eternity. The early hours were increasingly lonely as I lay there waiting for the first shafts of sunlight and the sounds of the dawn chorus.

By the second week, my whole demeanour had changed. Instead of being a happy-go-lucky joker, I was bad-tempered and depressed, and my studies began to suffer. Sitting down to write an essay was torture - I would start to write but my exhausted brain would begin to pound.
After six sleepless weeks, I felt like I was living in a permanent fog. When I stared into the mirror, the face of a haunted stranger looked back at me: there were dark shadows under my eyes and I'd lost loads of weight. I had to leave my job because I could no longer cope. I tried telling my friends about my problem, but they didn't understand the agony of total exhaustion.

At the end of the university summer term, I decided to take time out. I had not slept properly for more than three months, and I couldn't even read my text books. My eyes felt heavy, and I couldn't stop myself nodding off during the day. It brought no relief, though, because I'd wake up again after just a few minutes, more disorientated than ever. My mood turned black, and one day I had a furious argument with a poor man who was handing out fliers in the street. A rage descended on me and I started ranting at him like a maniac.

'I was a happy-go-lucky joker, but I ended up like a zombie. I lost my job and my girlfriend, and I even seriously thought about ending it all  -  just for the sleep'

I've always felt that illnesses need to be endured, so it was a year before I went to see my GP. He prescribed medication to help me sleep. I had always been against sleeping pills, but there was no alternative.

The dosage was strong and, on the first night, in the winter of 2003, I did manage to fall asleep at last. But it was a deep, druginduced stupor, not the restful, natural sleep I needed. When I woke the next day, my feet felt as though they were made of concrete blocks, and my whole body ached. But I had no choice - I had to keep on taking the medication.

Then, something good happened - through friends I met Anne. She seemed to understand what I was going through at first and was perfect for me. But, instead of enjoying life together, sharing holidays and making love, all I wanted to do was lie on the sofa or fall into a heavy, medicated sleep. I no longer had a social life - I was too exhausted to go out to the pubs and clubs I had once loved.

Sure, the medication meant I could now sleep for a few hours, but it left me feeling like the living dead. After just five months, Anne had had enough - the relationship was over. I was heartbroken. I had lost my job and now my girlfriend; I had been forced to defer my university course for a year, and my friends no longer called. In short, at just 27, I felt as though my life was over.

I was so depressed that I wondered if I should end my life just to get the sleep I craved. I was referred to a psychiatrist and given antidepressants as well as my sleeping pills. I tried natural remedies to help me sleep, but nothing worked, so when someone suggested the Innersound Centre in London, where healers called Qi Masters would do acupressure, I didn't raise my hopes. I booked a treatment and, although it was relaxing, I didn't feel any benefit.

But that night, as an experiment, I didn't take my sleep medication. I lay in bed, sighed - then fell asleep. I slept soundly until 7.30 in the morning - something that hadn't happened for two years. I felt I could face the world again - and, for the first time in months, I was functioning like a normal human being.

With my new-found energy, I signed up for healing classes - based on 1,000-year-old methods used by Korean monks - at Innersound. One night of full sleep led to another and my old personality returned. I started going out with my friends again and got a job as an insurance clerk. Then, in 2008, I gave up my job and flew to Korea to train as a Qi Master. This is now my life; treating other people who can't sleep.
I will never get back those two years that I lost through my unexplained sleep problems, but when I wake up in the morning, fully refreshed, I thank my lucky stars. I will never ever take a good night's sleep for granted again.


February 16, 2014, 08:46:12 PM
Reply #7

Offline Peter

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Re: KiHealth: London Testimonies
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2014, 08:46:12 PM »
This is interesting because it mentions Master Oh's supposedly being cured of cancer, and that he was the first Ki Master to leave South Korea.

http://www.positivehealth.com/article/chi-energy-martial-arts/ki-treatment-healing-with-sound-and-touch

Quote
About Master Oh
Having been diagnosed with the first stages of stomach cancer in his early twenties, Master Oh came to Ki Health. He healed himself with the Ki Method and went on to do the intensive training to become a Ki Master. He has now been a Ki Master almost twenty years and is well-known as the most senior Ki Master in the west, renowned for his healing ability. He was the first Ki Master to leave South Korea and introduce this method to the west, and has since opened Ki centres across three continents, including centres in Australia, US, Canada and the UK. Many of his patients travel a long distance to see him and he has helped people with a variety of chronic health conditions as well as with emotional and spiritual problems. As Manager of the UK branch, he trains other Ki Masters and is expanding the work of Ki Health across Europe.

The rest is worth saving:

Quote
What is Ki Energy?
Ki or Chi energy flows along the body’s meridians or energy channels, reaching all of the body’s cells and vital organs, giving them the life-force needed to function optimally and recover from illness or injury. When the flow is unimpeded, a person remains in good health, but problems occur when energy levels become low, the channels become blocked or the energy turns toxic. Most health conditions are caused by a combination of all three of these factors, although one may override the others. Stagnant energy caused by stress, unbalanced emotions, pollutants, inherited energy patterns and physical injuries can create serious illnesses over time.

Ki Treatment is based on the belief that we need to address these energy issues before good health is restored. Its principles are that the blockages and toxic energy have to be removed, and energy levels topped up in order for the patient to appreciably feel better.  Removing the energy blockages allows the existing energy to circulate better, often leading to some improvement, yet not entirely solving the problem.  All three separate issues need to be addressed.

Koichi Tohei, a student of Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of the martial art Aikido, defines Ki as: “the basic unit of the universe. It is the infinite gathering of infinitely small particles. Everything is ultimately composed of Ki. If you pursue this concept to the depth of human consciousness, you will understand the universal mind which governs all creation, loving and protecting all life. Everything originates from the Ki of the universe (p.12 of the Book of Ki).”

What is Ki Treatment?
Ki Treatment combines the power of sound and acupressure to transmit vital Ki Energy into the body’s 84,000 ki pores or holes, along 365 channels. The technique is based on ancient martial arts practices developed in South Korea, and requires high levels of Ki Energy on the part of the practitioner. Acupressure, or pressing the fingers vigorously into the body’s pressure points, allows new energy to flow through the energy channels. The practitioner directs sound vibrations to carry energy very deeply into the body and remove blockages using a breathing technique from the main energy centre in their abdomen. To the lay person this sounds like a series of sharp intakes of breath and grunts.  He converts toxic energy into intestinal gases and expels them.

Sound at the right frequency is a very powerful means of transmitting energy, and can remove blockages in the same way as surgeons can cause kidney stones to crumble by subjecting them to sound vibrations, or the way opera singers can shatter glass at very high pitches. It is occasionally necessary to avoid hands-on work, but it is very difficult to treat without sound. Some people who are very sensitive to energy can actually feel the energy in the sound, and it’s possible to receive some benefits just by listening to the Ki Treatment. Unlike other healing therapies that use sound, there are no instruments involved.

Ki Masters have a thorough understanding of Ki Energy and how it works in the body. The practitioner works on all the main pressure points across the full body, placing particular attention on any problem areas. Ki Treatment covers front, back and sitting, focusing on the abdomen area where people tend to store stress. Most of the energy channels pass through this region, and blockages removed from here tend to improve the circulation throughout the body. Ki Masters are very sensitive to energy and can feel even minor problems in the body’s energy system. Occasionally, they will treat without touching the patient, for instance after an operation. In such cases the practitioner will work just above the pressure point, or on another point which is more easily accessible, and which corresponds to the same energy channel.

Aside from improvement to specific health conditions, typical patient reactions tend to be heightened energy levels, an improvement in general mood, a feeling of calmness, and a greater sense of wellbeing. Ki Treatment is given fully-clothed and doesn’t interfere with any medication, or therapy. The number of sessions required varies, but generally the longer a person has been ill the longer it takes to become well, and age can also be a factor. Tiredness, pain, stress, depression, anxiety, insomnia, digestive problems and even infertility may be relieved, and in some cases cured completely after a course of Ki Treatments. Five sessions are recommended initially, with health advice followed by a progress assessment. Occasionally, the toxins dispersed by Ki Treatment can result in temporary side-effects, such as headaches or a skin rash, but this is very unusual and quickly clears up.

Philosophy and Origins
Ki Treatment is based on the 6,000 year-old Taoist principles of harmony, co-operation, unconditional giving, love and compassion for all living beings. At a fundamental level is the idea that life is created by a union of yin and yang energies, and that maintaining this harmony supports human and environmental health and happiness. Ki Energy, which is thought to be received once in our life at conception, also comes from the perfect balance of yin and yang and has the power to create and heal life. Children recover quickly from injuries and have more energy than adults because their battery is still ‘full’.

Ki Masters undergo years of physical, mental and spiritual training to be able to tap into pure, vital Ki Energy and transmit it to others. Practitioners cultivate a mind of love, free from greed, arrogance and jealousy, so that the energy they transmit is as health-giving as possible. They live an almost monastic life, with few possessions or worldly interests, and spend many hours a day in private practice; chanting, slow movements and meditation. Internationally, the final examinations to qualify as a Ki Master take place in Korea – the same training as the Korean Ki Masters undergo. Some Ki Masters in the London centre have lived the same traditional lifestyle for 15 years.

During Ki Treatment, practitioners’ minds are very focused.  This, combined with their ability to tap into a very pure and powerful frequency of Ki Energy, means sessions only take 15 minutes. They are able to diagnose where the patient’s energy is blocked, toxic or low and can concentrate on removing the blockages, toxic energy or recharging with vital energy. Often two people with the same physical symptoms have very different root problems energetically, and the practitioner will make his own diagnosis from what he senses during the session, as well as the patient’s health questionnaire.

Practitioners also conduct Ki Training classes and family healing ceremonies. The first Western centre opened in 1991 and since then several others have opened in Australia, USA, New Zealand, England and Japan.

Case Study[1]
A 30 year-old Japanese-American female had suffered for 18 months with chronic fatigue syndrome that no western doctor had been able to cure. She would sleep for 12 hours, wake feeling tired, and then be exhausted by 3 pm. She began to lose weight as well as colour from her cheeks. Medical examination found that her liver was jaundiced, inflamed and malfunctioning. After 18 months, her liver disorder had cleared but she was constantly tired, and decided to consult a Ki Master. He found that her body was not absorbing nutrients properly because her Ki pathways were blocked by stress. The morning after the second Ki Treatment, the patient slept a little. The colour in her cheeks improved and she subsequently gained some weight.  Apart from Ki Treatment, nothing else had changed in her eating habits, exercise regime or other health routines to account for the difference in her health. She received only three Ki Treatments and remained normal and healthy.

Scientific Evidence
In the same way that a good night’s sleep can result in a more positive outlook, and enables us to deal with what life throws at us, a strong energy system can result in increased emotional stability. Illness can cause energy levels to plummet, making people feel angry and negative. Research has shown that Ki Energy can give all-round health benefits, boosting the immune, hormonal, and cardiovascular systems. Stress hormones decrease, while natural killer cell activity and endorphin levels are significantly raised.
One study featured on the Ki Health website investigated the effects of Ki-therapy on pain and other symptoms related to premenstrual syndrome (PMS) over nine sessions and two menstrual cycles.[2] Forty-six women attending college were randomly allocated to receive Ki-therapy (n = 23) or a placebo on a waiting list as controls (n = 22; 1 dropped out). Ki-therapy had a significant effect on pain and water retention, plus short-term effects on pain, mental depression and anxiety. These results suggest that Ki-therapy might be useful as a restorative aid for women who suffer from PMS to maintain or restore a balance of Ki. 

Further Information
Ki Health International is a registered health charity staffed mostly by volunteers, dedicated to actively caring for people. The Centre funds community work, offering free Ki Treatments to the elderly, homeless people, mental health patients and those who wouldn’t normally be able to access this kind of service. Ki Health International supports London’s emergency services by giving Ki Treatments to staff during their working day. The project supports those who have the biggest responsibility for caring for and protecting London’s communities. The Supporting our Services project has helped the Metropolitan Police, the Fire Brigade, London Ambulance service and UCL hospitals. You may contact Ki Health International on Tel: 020-7636 3500; www.kihealth.org.

June 24, 2014, 05:26:49 PM
Reply #8

Offline Peter

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Re: KiHealth: London Testimonies
« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2014, 05:26:49 PM »
Another researchless piece of propaganda:
March 30, 2014: The Alternative: the Qi Master
Quote
By Anna Murphy

A visit to a so-called Qi Master may sound a rather esoteric enterprise, to say the least. But the people who file through the doors of Master Oh come with a range of far from esoteric complaints, from back pain to depression, by way of every condition you can think of. Often they are desperate, at the end of the road.

“In Western terms 'qi’ means vital energy,” says the 49-year-old Master Oh, who came to Britain from Korea 12 years ago. “In my patients I see three different qi problems – a shortage, a blockage and an imbalance. You are born with a certain level of qi. It is like your car battery. And when this energy becomes low, it creates problems, physical and emotional. I recharge people’s battery.”

Qi (or chi) lies at the heart of Chinese medicine. Master Oh works within the Korean branch, and undertook a rigorous training – involving sleep and food deprivation – in order to learn how to “channel energy from the universe”.
“I use and share vital energy, very clear light, to release toxins, stress, blockages.” In practical terms his work takes the form of the world’s oddest massage. Master Oh manipulates your body, releasing your toxins through his own body in what can only be described as burps, then draws qi into your body with loud sucking noises. All rather baffling. Until you realise how transformed you feel; how long-standing issues, physical and emotional, have dematerialised. “People develop problems because their energy system isn’t working properly. I let the energy circulate freely so the body gets what it needs, so mind and body become one.”

What is it?
Qi, according to Chinese medicine, is vital energy or life force, the animating force of every living thing. “We have 12 energy expressways in our body. If they are working you are basically OK.” In fact, our qi – given to us at conception – is often lessened or blocked by patterns inherited from our parents, then further depleted over the years by the challenges of life, and through physical or emotional habits of behaviour or response.
What is it good for?

Master Oh works on whatever is blocking or depleting your qi in order restore the levels within your body. Increased qi brings you back into physical and emotional balance. “There are hundreds of different reasons for one symptom. A headache, say, could be a weakness in the heart, kidneys, stomach. Modern medicine treats the symptom without knowing its origin. We work on the origin. I can see the energy, and how it works.”
How did it start?

Qi-related practices developed in the East 6,000 years ago as “a way of living”. Master Oh also teaches chanting, breathing exercises, meditation and movement to help people improve and maintain their own qi flow.
Who’s a believer?

Master Oh works with Everton Football Club, as well as charities for children, veterans, the homeless and the mentally ill in Britain and abroad.
£180 per hour; masteroh.com