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July 10, 2007, 09:30:57 AM
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Offline Peter

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Australian $cientology Murders
« on: July 10, 2007, 09:30:57 AM »
Last Thursday a young women stabbed to death her father and 15 her old sister in Sydney.
She also stabbed her mother, who survived.

Her parents are Scientologists who denied their mentally ill daughter the psychiatric treatment she obviously needed.

Lots of articles coming out of Australia about this.

Here are some of them:

Scientologist parents 'denied treatment'

    A Sydney woman accused of fatally stabbing her father and sister and injuring her mother was denied psychiatric treatment by her parents who were scientologists, a court was told.

    The 25-year-old woman, who cannot be named, was diagnosed with a psychotic illness in late 2006 and was recommended to have follow-up treatment at Bankstown Hospital, in Sydney's south-west.

    Dr Mark Cross, the consultant psychiatrist and clinical director of Liverpool and Fairfield Mental Health Services, said the woman's parents refused this treatment.

    "She had a history of being diagnosed with a psychotic illness in late 2006 at Bankstown Hospital, but follow-up from the mental health team was apparently declined by her parents because of their alleged scientology beliefs," Dr Cross said.
     
    The woman allegedly stabbed her 53-year-old father and 15-year-old sister to death at the family home in Hydrae Street at Revesby in Sydney's south-west on Thursday.

    It is also alleged she stabbed her 52-year-old mother, who raised the alarm as she collapsed in a neighbour's driveway.

    The woman told the neighbour her daughter had just killed her husband but that it wasn't her fault because she was "sick".

    According to a police fact sheet tendered to Bankstown Local Court, the neighbour saw the 24-year-old still holding a knife as he put a blanket over the injured mother-of-six.

    It's alleged that he stood up and looked over the fence and saw the woman walking calmly towards him, but after he told her the police were coming she walked away.

    Police said the blood-soaked 24-year-old then got into a passing car and asked the driver if he was the person that was taking her to Croatia.

    It's alleged that when the man said no, the woman appeared annoyed, and got out of the car only to stop it again moments later.

    She then agreed that the driver take her to the police station, before getting out again when they were passed by a police car, which was responding to the triple-0 call.

    When she was arrested minutes later, she allegedly said: "I've just butchered my family. I stabbed dad, mum and sister.

    "They are all dead."

    She was then taken to hospital where she allegedly shouted at staff that she wanted a knife and wanted more killing.

    According to Dr Cross's report, instead of receiving follow-up treatment by Bankstown Hospital's mental health team, the woman had instead seen a private psychiatrist as well as a psychologist.

    She also was prescribed an anti-depressant as well as an anti-psychotic treatment that she took until January this year, which made her feel anxious, and depressed. She also experienced poor sleep and felt unsafe at home.

    "She stated that her parents did not want her to take the prescribed medication she had been on in 2006, and apparently started her on medication they got from America - which was not psychiatric in nature," Dr Cross said.

    The woman told Dr Cross that her feelings started to worsen three weeks before the killings and that her parents allowed her to restart her anti-psychotic medication as it helped her to sleep.

    The woman was supported by about 20 family and friends at Bankstown Local Court where she was charged with two counts of murder and one count of inflicting grievous bodily harm with intent to murder.

    She was formally refused bail to face Burwood Local Court on Wednesday.



    July 09, 2007 08:13pm

    A SYDNEY woman accused of fatally stabbing her father, sister and injuring her mother was denied psychiatric treatment by her parents who were Scientologists, a court was told today.
    The 24-year-old woman, who cannot be named, was diagnosed with a psychotic illness in late 2006 and recommended follow-up treatment at Bankstown Hospital, in Sydney's southwest.
    Dr Mark Cross, the consultant psychiatrist and clinical director of Liverpool and Fairfield Mental Health Services, said the woman's parents refused this treatment.

    "She had a history of being diagnosed with a psychotic illness in late 2006 at Bankstown Hospital, but follow-up from the mental health team was apparently declined by her parents because of their alleged Scientology beliefs," Dr Cross said.

    The woman allegedly stabbing her 53-year-old father and 15-year-old sister to death at the family home in Hydrae Street at Revesby in Sydney's southwest on Thursday.

    It is also alleged she stabbed her 52-year-old mother, who raised the alarm as she collapsed in a neighbour's driveway.

    The woman told the neighbour her daughter had just killed her husband but that it wasn't her fault because she was "sick".

    According to a police fact sheet tendered to Bankstown Local Court, the neighbour saw the 24-year-old still holding a knife as he put a blanket over the injured mother-of-six.

    It's alleged that he stood up and looked over the fence and saw the woman walking calmly towards him, but after he told her the police were coming she walked away.

    Police said the blood-soaked 24-year-old then got into a passing car and asked the driver if he was the person that was taking her to Croatia.

    It's alleged that when the man said no, the woman appeared annoyed, and got out of the car only to stop it again moments later.

    She then agreed that the driver take her to the police station, before getting out again when they were passed by a police car, which was responding to the triple-0 call.

    When she was arrested minutes later, she allegedly said: "I've just butchered my family. I stabbed dad, mum and sister.

    "They are all dead."

    She was then taken to hospital where she allegedly shouted at staff that she wanted a knife and wanted more killing.

    According to Dr Cross's report, instead of receiving follow-up treatment by Bankstown Hospital's mental health team, the woman had instead seen a private psychiatrist as well as a psychologist.

    She also was prescribed an anti-depressant as well as an anti-psychotic treatment that she took until January this year, which made her feel anxious, and depressed.

    She also experienced poor sleep and felt unsafe at home.

    "She stated that her parents did not want her to take the prescribed medication she had been on in 2006, and apparently started her on medication they got from America which was not psychiatric in nature," Dr Cross said.

    The woman told Dr Cross that her feelings started to worsen three weeks before the killings and that her parents allowed her to restart her anti-psychotic medication as it helped her to sleep.

    The woman was supported by about 20 family and friends at Bankstown Local Court where she was charged with two counts of murder and one count of inflicting grievous bodily harm with intent to murder.

    She was formally refused bail to face Burwood Local Court on Wednesday

Another:

http://abc.net.au/news/stories/2007/07/09/1973968.htm?section=australia

Scientology's growth in Victoria:
http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,22038951-2862,00.html

And just a week ago, the President of Scientology in Melbourne was defending his cult.
Bad timing Mr President:


    July 05, 2007 01:00am
    Article from: Font size: + -
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    WHILE we may sometimes agree to disagree with another's religious beliefs and practices, one principle fundamental to Australians is the notion of a fair go.
    Jill Singer has the right to think what she likes about Scientology.

    But it is clear from what she wrote that she doesn't know the first thing about Scientology and relies on a report almost half-a-century old.

    Former Victorian Health Minister Tom Roper had the good sense to comment much later that the report and the subsequent repealed legislation was "draconian law passed in a time of hysteria".

    The Victorian public deserves some facts.

    My family donates to the Church of Scientology.

    We have already paid our taxes once for our hard work before we pay it to the church and donations we make to Scientology are not tax deductible.

    Why should our church then have to pay income tax on the donation that we have already paid taxes on?

    The people who would benefit from my church being income-tax free would be those we help with our programs, such as our anti-drug campaigns.

    Last time I looked, society supported those organisations that support so many others.

    The beliefs of almost any religious, philosophical, political or social group are susceptible to derision if viewed outside of their proper context.

    Racism is fundamentally based on ignorance and prejudice is no different.

    Just because someone doesn't believe what we believe is no basis for denying us the basic rights afforded to all similar organisations.

    Churches have long been plugging the holes in society, ensuring the neglected and the misunderstood have someone to turn to.

    Scientology has helped untold numbers of people to put their life back together and make a success of themselves when everything seemed to be stacked against them.

    Scientology provides a practical methodology that can be applied to life.

    Discrimination is ugly and is the root of all wars and inhumanity to man.

    If I could give more money to Scientology I would, and so would many others.

    Wouldn't you give money to a drug rehab program that gets more than 78 per cent of people off drugs forever?

    Scientologists are out there on the weekends helping others, taking unpaid leave or giving up holidays to help if someone needs a helping hand.

    The guys in the yellow T-shirts, the Scientology volunteer ministers, are well known when there is a flood, hurricane or disaster around the world.

    The Scientology relief team was one of the first into Aceh after the tsunami and one of the last to leave.

    The full bench of the High Court that unanimously declared Scientology a bona fide religious organisation is far more competent to make judgment on such issues than Jill Singer.

    If you are interested in what makes successful people like Kate Ceberano or John Travolta so interested in Scientology, find out for yourself.

    - Emmanuel Foundas is president of the Church of Scientology of Melbourne

Responces to the above:

http://www.news.com.au/comments/0,23600,22020276-5007146,00.html

http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,2144,2670590,00.html