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Author Topic: Short film "No Man is an Island" brings religious extremes face to face  (Read 1906 times)

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May 01, 2016, 02:05:09 AM
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Offline Peter

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April 27, 2016: No Man is an Island Brings Religious Extremes Face to Face (The Korea Herald)

Quote
“No Man is an Island” is a drama that follows a leader from a Korean cult to the southern Philippines, where he finds himself prey to Abu Sayyaf terrorists who hold him hostage.

But according to Ang, the cults he used as inspiration for the film are quite predatory themselves.

“The most troubling thing is that they use fraud ‘religion’ not only to gain money but to molest their members, mostly leading to what they justified as unforced sexual interactions between the willing members of their church,” said Ang. ...

The story is fiction, but Ang has based it on real groups, consulting his team member who grew up in the area where Abu Sayyaf, which is linked to the Islamic State group, is active.

On the Korean side, Ang said he had been recruited by cults as part of research for another film. “I knew already what they were, but as a documentary filmmaker, I just voluntarily let them recruit me and experienced attending some events to observe what’s really happening in there,” he said.
I'm really curious to know what cults he spent time with and the experiences he had within them. I'd better get myself along that showing...

May 04, 2016, 12:06:35 PM
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Offline Peter

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Well, the director was a little coy about which cults he spent time in, but he certainly did his homework. The dialogue was all consistent with the language of cults, which is always so sure of itself "God wants..." "The truth is..." And I liked how the Korean Bible-based cult leader, who had a penchant for abusing his power sexually ala Jeong Myeong-seok, came face to face with Islamic extremism, which made for a nice contrast and highlighted the point that they're cut from the same cloth. Unfortunately, it may be a while before the film is available as 1) it's one part of a great whole and not all those other parts are finished yet and 2) the director may expand the above and make a longer film from the premise.

However long it takes and whatever form the finished product takes, I was heartened to see interest in and passion for the subject of Korean cults and to see that interest and passion expressed in a rather unique way. I'll definitely keep an eye on the development of the project and hopefully attend screenings at film festivals here in Seoul.